A map shows the Lockyer Valley, where police continue to search for flood victims. Image: Supplied
A map shows the Lockyer Valley, where police continue to search for flood victims. Image: Supplied

Map reveals scale of search

POLICE are still searching for the bodies of people who have been missing from the Lockyer Valley since floods tore through two weeks ago.

With a search area that covered more than 250km – from Murphys Creek to Patrick Estate – nine people remained unaccounted for.

The death toll from flood-related incidents in south-east Queensland since January 10 now stands at 22.

The majority of those deaths occurred in Toowoomba and Grantham – in the Lockyer Valley between Gatton and Helidon – where water moved with such ferocity that it created an ‘inland tsunami’, giving residents no warning and no time to flee.

In the worst incidents, houses were ripped from their foundations and hurled downstream – sometimes with people still inside.

The search area (marked in purple on the map opposite) meanders from Murphys Creek down into the Lockyer Creek, which it follows until it reaches an area just south of Wivenhoe Dam, near Patrick Estate, where the Lockyer meets the Brisbane River.

It also branches off into some of the smaller creeks which feed into the Lockyer Creek near Postman’s Ridge, Grantham, Ma Ma Creek and Tenthill.

Human remains have been found within the search area as recently as Sunday, when police retrieved the body of a person suspected to have drowned at Lowood. Police said on Saturday, at about 6pm, a resident found what was believed to be human remains at Murphys Creek.

The identities of the deceased were unknown and police were yet to add them to the official flood count.

Detectives and forensic specialists were investigating the deaths on behalf of the Coroner.

Police said 35 people have died in flood-related incidents in Queensland, since November 30, last year.



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