The Heart Foundation is busting salt myths.
The Heart Foundation is busting salt myths. Contributed

Heart Foundation warns of too much salt in our diet

THE Heart Foundation has busted salt myths with nutrition manager Deanne Wooden encouraging residents to stop and check the labels of pre-packaged food with many hiding high levels of sodium.

She said the guide for food low in salt was a sodium level of less than 120mg.

"If it's over 400mg avoid it and buy something else," she said.

Ms Wooden said salt in processed foods was the biggest culprit of high salt content.

"The innocent looking boxes and packets of processed food items can contain incredibly high levels of salt," she said.

Heart Foundation Nutrition Manager Deanne Wooden is busting myths on salt consumption.
Heart Foundation Nutrition Manager Deanne Wooden is busting myths on salt consumption. Contributed

Myth: Himalayan pink salt and sea salt are healthier than table salt.

Fact: Salt is salt, whatever the source.

Myth: Salt intake would mostly be through salt added when cooking or dining.

Fact: About 75 per cent of our salt intake comes from processed foods, before you even pick up the salt shaker.

Myth: There would be noticeable health impacts if your salt consumption was too high.

Fact: About 28 per cent of Australians could have high blood pressure and over half don't know it.

Myth: Sweet foods are low in salt.

Fact: Baked products, sweet and savoury, have high levels of salt added.

Visit www.heartfoundation.org.au



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