A hot breakfast, but probably not the type almost two million women are now eating at their desk.
A hot breakfast, but probably not the type almost two million women are now eating at their desk.

Most important meal of the day is often had at work

IF YOU didn't already spend enough time at work, a new report shows almost two million women are now eating the most important meal of the day there.

New research, commissioned by Helga's, has found 45% of women working full-time sometimes skip breakfast completely, and the more money they earnt the more likely they were to eat their breakfast at work.

Work pressures were also cited as a key reason for women skipping breakfast, with only 55% of full-time workers managing to squeeze in their morning meal each day.

Symptoms reported from not having breakfast included low energy levels (44% of women), nausea (25%), poor concentration (20%) and irritibility (18%).

Instead of relying on a good breakfast, many women turn to coffee (51%) and snacking (51%) to help them get through the day. One in four women relies on a quick sugar fix for energy during the day.

Dietitian Geraldine Georgeou said eating lunch at your desk had been a long-standing trend, but the number of women eating breakfast there too was worrying.

"A shocking number of women are skipping this important meal because it saves time in the morning, but the reality is it will cost them later in the day as they turn to unhealthy foods and become lethargic," she said.

"Breakfast is not just the first meal of the day, it's the one that provides you with the energy to kick-start your daily activities."



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