Former One Nation leader Pauline Hanson announced she will be running for a seat in the New South Wales upper house.
Former One Nation leader Pauline Hanson announced she will be running for a seat in the New South Wales upper house.

Hanson on political comeback trail

FORMER Ipswich politician and fish and chip shop owner Pauline Hanson has returned to politics, bidding for a seat in the New South Wales upper house.

Ms Hanson, who became famous as the leader of the One Nation party, said her new political platform would be focused on stopping the privatisation of public assets and law and order reform.

She also stated she was not a racist but was concerned about Australia’s rising multiculturalism.

“I have ... as an Australian ... a right to question immigration and multiculturalism, which I don’t believe is helping our country,” she said.

“I believe in people coming here, assimilating, becoming Australians and be proud of this country and abide by the laws of the land.

“I don’t think there’s anything wrong with that.”

Ms Hanson was an Ipswich councillor in 1994 before winning the 1996 Federal seat of Oxley, which covered Ipswich at the time.

Just before that election, Hanson told The Queensland Times that she supported the cutting of government assistance for Aborigines above what was available for other Australians.

That stance was reported as one of the major reasons for her election victory.

Ms Hanson will now stand for an upper house seat with a group of 16 independents and conceded it would be a “battle” to get elected.

She said she had been thinking about making a political comeback since last year, with voters urging her to stand.

“Something I’d like to consider and put to the government is the separation of powers of the police force to the parliament,” she said.

“I don’t think the police force should be controlled by a minister of police.

“They could look at separating them so they (police) can get on and do their job.”

The NSW Labor and Liberal parties have vowed not to direct preferences to Ms Hanson in the state election on March 26.

NSW Premier Kristina Keneally greeted the news of Hanson’s return by accusing her of harbouring racist views.

“The NSW branch of the Labor Party will be providing no support whatsoever to Ms Pauline Hanson’s bid to enter the NSW parliament,” she said.

Ms Hanson’s last foray into politics was the 2009 Queensland election.

SEATS CONTESTED:

1996, Oxley, federal election, won.

1998, Blair, federal election, lost.

2001, Queensland Senate seat in federal election, lost.

2003, NSW upper house in State election, lost.

2004, Queensland Senate seat in federal election, lost.

2007, Queensland Senate seat in federal election, lost.

2009, Queensland State election, Beaudesert, lost.



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