Indian myna eggs taken from a native bird box in Caniaba. Photo Contributed
Indian myna eggs taken from a native bird box in Caniaba. Photo Contributed Contributed

Group's call for help catching and euthansing pest birds

AN IPSWICH group determined to catch and euthanase pest birds across the city has put a call out to other interested residents, hoping for a joint action plan.

The group, Ipswich Indian Myna Action Group, wants to humanely trap and dispose of the destructive birds and this week invited other concerned residents to meet in the New Year to discuss the best way to move forward.

Indian myna bird.
Indian myna bird. T G Santosh

Ipswich City Council does offer assistance to residents by loaning them a trap to remove the birds, however the Indian myna is known to evade traps.

They are intelligent birds and quickly learn to evade capture while warning others to stay away.

Indian myna birds are native to India and were introduced to Australia around 1860 to control insect populations including on the North Queensland cane fields.

Indian myna birds are a common sight around Ipswich and areas heavily affected by human activity, such as large areas of cleared land, are ideal habitats for the species.

The brown Indian mynas, not to be confused with grey native myna birds, compete aggressively for nesting hollows and can evict native parrots from nests, even killing eggs and chicks, while in other cases evicting native gliders and possums.

In a fact sheet the State Government's Biosecurity Department said there are several community action groups, similar to the Ipswich group, across the country.

Fraser Coast man John Williams uses decoy birds to attract Indian mynas, an invasive species, into wire traps. (File pic)
Fraser Coast man John Williams uses decoy birds to attract Indian mynas, an invasive species, into wire traps. (File pic) Lauren Smit

They trap and euthanase Indian mynas, however the effectiveness of the groups has not been fully evaluated, the State Government said.

"Forming a community action group requires careful scoping, consultation, research and planning," the fact sheet reads.

"Existing groups publish a lot of their information, but be aware that local area laws and conditions must be considered when adapting this information.

"Members must be prepared to contribute significant time and resources to the enterprise and understand the following issues."

Interested in being involved?

Contact the Ipswich group on Facebook to let them know.

What can you do to help?

  • Clear away food scraps after eating outdoors
  • Feed pets indoors, or clear away when they've finished
  • Plant native shrubs to reduce open areas in gardens
  • Avoid planting trees with dense foliage, such as pencil pines, in which Mynas will roost at night
  • Block holes in roofs or eaves to prevent Mynas from roosting or nesting - make sure you don't accidentally trap a possum, bat or other native species.
  • On farms, feed stock only as much as they need, cover the feed bins and clean up any spills.


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