Eating 30g of nuts per day is believed to significantly reduce the risk of developing heart disease.
Eating 30g of nuts per day is believed to significantly reduce the risk of developing heart disease.

28g trick that’ll stop accumulative weight gain

ADULTS put on almost half a kilo per year but scientists have found the way to break the unhealthy, accumulative weight gain - and it's nuts.

By substituting just one low nutrition snack with nuts every day, Queenslanders could control their long-term body weight and boost their health.

The researchers from Harvard define one serve as 28g of whole nuts or two tablespoons of nut butter.

"There is a misconception that nuts can put weight on but a handful a day actually helps stave off overeating.

Nuts are highly nutritious and full of good fats which sit in the stomach and keep hunger pangs away.

Substitute the biscuits at 3pm with a few nuts and there will be benefits," Brisbane accredited dietitian Kate Di Prima said.

Some fat is also trapped in the fibrous structure of nuts which means it passes through the body rather than being digested.

Australian Dietary Guidelines include nuts in the same food group as meat, fish, poultry, eggs and legumes due to their protein content but they are also all filled with nutrients and fibre.

There is a misconception that nuts can put weight on but a handful a day actually helps stave off overeating.
There is a misconception that nuts can put weight on but a handful a day actually helps stave off overeating.

Almonds have protein, calcium and vitamin E, Brazil nuts have fibre and selenium and pine nuts vitamin E and arginine amino acid.

The study looked at nut consumption every four years in three different groups, each with tens of thousands of participants.

The researchers found that eating a daily serving of any type of nut or peanuts was associated with less risk of weight gain or becoming obese over the four-year intervals.

"Once people reach adulthood, they start to gradually gain about one pound a year of weight, which seems small. But if you consider gaining one pound over 20 years, it accumulates to a lot of weight gain," Xiaoran Liu, first author of the study and a research associate in the nutrition department of Harvard School of Public Health in Boston.

"Adding one ounce of nuts to your diet in place of less healthy foods - such as red or processed meat, French fries or sugary snacks - may help prevent that slow, gradual weight gain after you enter adulthood and reduce the risk of obesity-related cardiovascular diseases," she said.

Eating 30g of nuts per day is believed to reduce the risk of developing heart disease by 30 to 50 per cent and can reduce the risk of death by close to 20 per cent.



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