News

Have $12.50? Ipswich store sells fashion for peanuts

POPPIN' tags with $20 in your pocket will leave some change.

About $14 change to be exact as the art of op-shopping, thrifting, goodwill, bargain hunting and all its other definitions is making its rise to retail reality.

Moccasins that somebody else has been walking in, racks lined with one-offs, retro and vintage pieces and the odd hidden gem are re-defining fashion.

One man's trash is most definitely another man's one-up as national and international designer pieces hang on plastic hangers hidden deep between rows of chain store pieces, waiting for their new owner to re-invent them.

Choose a full outfit, add a bag and throw some shoes in the basket too for no more than $16.

Op-shopping has its financial incentives but the thousands of pre-loved items cleaned, sorted and neatly presented by an army of volunteers mean fast fashion is having an eco-conscious, recycled face lift.

As global consumers churn through 80 billion pieces of clothing each year, up 400% from two decades ago, thrifting is the ideal alternative to cookie-cutter fashion.

Ben Wilmott and Therese Jones model clothing from the St Pauls Variety Store.
Ben Wilmott and Therese Jones model clothing from the St Pauls Variety Store. Rob Williams

 

St Paul's Variety Market manager and church parishioner Elaine Drennan is part of the process which sees the community changing up their look with a few loose coins.

She said a new outfit was sometimes enough to change somebodies life.

"I had a gentleman who had to go to a funeral and had hardly any money and we just decked him out and let him go. I felt really good about that, I don't think he had anybody else to help him," she said.

"We have a lot of people who can't afford the prices you pay in a shop and they become our regular customers. That's another reason we all love being here, we're helping people who really can't afford anything else and that way they can have nice clothes.

Ben Wilmott and Therese Jones model clothing from the St Pauls Variety Store.
Ben Wilmott and Therese Jones model clothing from the St Pauls Variety Store. Rob Williams

 

"It's lots of fun because everyone is here because they love being here, we have it to heart."

Elaine has spent the last seven years decking out Ipswich with vintage and retro pieces.

She said she had seen everything from real fur, jewellery and ball gowns to underwear and costumes snapped up for next to nothing.

"There is always something unusual and interesting," she said.

Ben Wilmott and Therese Jones model clothing from the St Pauls Variety Store.
Ben Wilmott and Therese Jones model clothing from the St Pauls Variety Store. Rob Williams

 

"You wouldn't even know you're wearing second hand, quite a few things come in and they still have the tag on them. It's brand new and they'll go out for a pittance, nothing like a $150 frock.

"We've had ladies buy ball gowns and go to the really fancy dances, wedding guests, people looking for a costume to wear on a Saturday night.

"You can buy a man's suit for $6."

Cryil Wheeler, Elaine Drennan, Helen Wheeler and Kerry Walker work at the St Pauls Varierty Market.
Cryil Wheeler, Elaine Drennan, Helen Wheeler and Kerry Walker work at the St Pauls Varierty Market. Rob Williams

Topics:  ipswich shop op shop st pauls vareity market thrifting



Paul Pisasale: Who was the woman at Brisbane watch-house?

Dr Patricia Petersen dressed up for Australia Day

Who was the woman who met Pisasale outside the Brisbane watch-house

Officer to undergo disease testing after spitting offence

NSW police at Coffs Harbour boat ramp. Photo: Trevor Veale / The Coffs Coast Advocate

Welfare checks turns into serious assault on police

10 things to do these school holidays

people, winter, friendship, sport and leisure concept - happy friends ice skating on rink outdoors

Your guide to keeping the kids entertained

Local Partners

Schapelle Corby's Bali boyfriend 'lonely' now she's free

SCHAPELLE Corby’s boyfriend Ben Panangian has spoken of his loneliness for the first time since his lover of 11 years was deported from Bali.

‘One of the most ludicrous films ever made’

Optimus Prime in Transformers: The Last Knight.

Transformers: The Last Knight has been shredded by critics.

Transformers movie bombs to horror opening week

Optimus Prime in a scene from, "Transformers: The Last Knight."

Transformers 5 had the worst opening in the franchise’s history

How 9/11 helped make Waleed Aly a household name

Waleed Aly and Susan Carland at the 2016 Logie Awards

“It feels like there was a script written for me,” he said.

Pixar weighs in on viral Toy Story theory

Woody and Buzz Lightyear from Toy Story.

DID Andy’s dad tragically die just before the story took place?

VIRAL VIDEO: Campaign to bring beloved nanny to Maryborough

** ADVANCE FOR MONDAY, OCT. 16 **FILE**This promotional photo provided by Disney Home Entertainment shows actors Julie Andrews as Mary Poppins and Dick Van Dyke as Bert in a scene from the 40th anniversary edition of the Disney DVD. P. L. Travers, author of the "Mary Poppins" books, approved of Andrews as Poppins but considered Van Dyke "all wrong" and objected to mixing animated characters with live actors. (AP Photo/Disney Home Entertainment)

Can we get Dame Julie Andrews to come to our festival?

Confident first half year for commercial property

SIGNS OF CONFIDENCE: A mixed-use site at 139 Eumundi Rd, Noosaville, was one of the outstanding results achieved in the year.

Sunshine Coast market showing strong signs for next five years

Ocean views up for sale at Bargara Rise

LAND RELEASE: Rob Sergiacomi on site at the Bargara Rise development off Watsons Road Bargara.

More ocean-view land comes on the market at Bargara

Blueberries help property market boom

RURAL MARKET: Elders sale agent Terry Deefholts, Norman Arkan and rural sales agent Angus McDonald.

Growth in the rural property market

Gateway to $3 billion, 4800 home new Coast city opens

The start of Peter Crosby Way at Sippy Downs, the northern access into the Harmony master-planned community at Palmview.

Palmview's $3b master-planned community of Harmony

Millionaire Nathan Birch to offload $55M in property

Nathan Birch wants to focus more on developing properties.

Sydney property investor has announced he is selling up

Ready to SELL your property?

Post Your Ad Here!