PAYBACK: Saskia Christiansen leaves Ipswich Courthouse after she was sentenced on more than two dozen online banking fraud offences.
PAYBACK: Saskia Christiansen leaves Ipswich Courthouse after she was sentenced on more than two dozen online banking fraud offences. Ross Irby

Fraudster dipped in to partner's account

A NURSE forced to give up her profession because of an illness used the online banking details of her former boyfriend to steal from his account.

She set the account up so he could pay off his SPER debts.

An Ipswich court heard that the middle-aged woman was left financially struggling at the time after breaking up with the man who once shared her home.

Saskia Christiansen, 59, (also known as Saskia Peterson) from Coominya, pleaded guilty in Ipswich Magistrates Court to 27 fraud charges by dishonestly applying the property of another; and dealing with another person's identification information to commit an offence.

The offences were committed between August 2014 and December 2016.

Prosecutor Sergeant Tracy Long said they lived together for 16 months and he had not become aware of her offending.

Sgt Long said Christiansen set up an online banking account for the man but he'd never given her permission to access it.

Then in August 2014 she linked his account up to deposit money into an account that was nicknamed, "S. Peterson".

The man had not used his account online and did not own a computer.

In November 2017, the man made a complaint to police alleging he was the victim of fraudulent transactions.

Sgt Long said there had been 27 transactions of $100 - a total of $2700.

"She says she created the online account and has accessed his money," Sgt Long said.

"She memorised his account number and password. And knew she was doing wrong but had struggled financially."

Defence lawyer Andrew Rich said Christiansen was in a relationship with the man, who was living at her property rent-free.

She paid for their food, bills and alcohol. And his GoVia road toll charges.

She had sent him text messages offering to repay the money but received no reply.

Magistrate Andy Cridland said while such cases would usually result in a jail sentence he found a fine would be appropriate as she was unlikely to come before a court again.

He fined her $1000, and ordered she repay the $2700. A conviction was not recorded.



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