NO RECESSION: At his Goodna home, flood victim Frank Beaumont still lives with the pain and loss caused by the devastating 2011 event.
NO RECESSION: At his Goodna home, flood victim Frank Beaumont still lives with the pain and loss caused by the devastating 2011 event. Inga Williams

Frank loses valuables and family in devastating 2011 floods

POST-traumatic stress caused by 2011's devastating floods has torn a Goodna family apart and created wounds that are unlikely to ever heal.

On January 10, the night before the flood peaked, Frank Beaumont and his family walked through knee-deep mud away from their home, knowing it would be consumed by a slow-moving but catastrophic event.

Being aware and prepared for the situation did little to ease the pain of loss.

"I switched the TV off and thought oh well, I don't think I'll ever switch you back on again," he recalled.

"We lost everything."

In the years to follow, the material loss of possessions would be outweighed by the emotional toll the flood had caused Mr Beaumont.

"My family broke up because of this," he said.

"The kids took three years to return to the home - my wife lives in Melbourne now.

"I battle on every day but you don't know what to do."

With his property price plummeting since the flood and an insurance company quoting $19,900 each year for flood cover, the 75-year old is stuck, still repairing the damage.

Each time Mr Beaumont drives a nail or cleans the mud off walls he is painfully reminded of the event.

It took about six months to return to the home following the flood, albeit without a kitchen and barely in a liveable state.

He still gets frustrated when people describe the situation as only "a bit of water through your house".

"I couldn't find my house for four days," he said.

"I couldn't see the TV aerial, water had covered two-storeys."

In 2016 several community members promised to assist Mr Beaumont to rebuild but never delivered.

"Don't promise things you're not going to keep," he said.

"When people do that it just makes you feel like we weren't really that important."

He hopes the flood class action in Sydney will bring some sense of closure.



Read everything for just $1 a week for first 12 weeks

Premium Content Read everything for just $1 a week for first 12 weeks

Deal gives you access to local, regional and metro News sites

Drought: an insidious and ongoing threat to Australia

Premium Content Drought: an insidious and ongoing threat to Australia

Local university expert says droughts should remain a top priority for...

Man in critical condition after home goes up in flames

Premium Content Man in critical condition after home goes up in flames

A man is in a critical condition after a fire in Bundamba