Footage crucial to RSPCA warrants

THE RSPCA may never have been able to get the evidence it needed to prove that live-baiting was taking place, if not for the work of Animal Liberation Queensland and Animals Australia.

It was the animal protection groups' initiative to hide cameras on the training track of Tom Noble, at Churchable, north of Gatton, that ultimately gave the RSPCA the evidence it needed to secure a warrant and raid the property on February 11.

RSPCA Queensland CEO Mark Townend said he was shocked by what the hidden cameras revealed.

"It made me ashamed to be Australian," he said.

"I believe that the hierarchy of greyhound racing must have known about this - there are too many successful people involved for them not to know."

The RSPCA is still investigating, but is looking to lay charges against those involved under the Animal Care and Protection Act 2001.

The maximum penalty for anyone found guilty of an offence under the act is a $33,000 fine or two years in jail.

Meanwhile, Racing Queensland has expressed its disgust and has promised to take immediate action in relation to "all individuals implicated in the program".

CEO Darren Condon said live baiting was criminal and abhorrent by nature.

He called on members of the public to report live baiting to police, RSPCA or Racing Queensland.



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