Puma Bli Bli service station is expected to reopen in coming weeks after being closed for six months while extensive works were carried out. Picture: Patrick Woods​
Puma Bli Bli service station is expected to reopen in coming weeks after being closed for six months while extensive works were carried out. Picture: Patrick Woods​

Flood-stricken servo under pump to reopen ‘within weeks’

The operator of a longstanding Coast service station says major flooding damage has delayed reopening of the prominent site.

The Puma Bli Bli service station was closed in September last year for scheduled maintenance which included relining fuel tanks and replacing pipelines.

There has been a service station at the intersection of David Low Way and Petrie Creek Road since at least the early 1970s.

Stormwater fills a large hole in the ground at the Puma Bli Bli service station on Monday.
Stormwater fills a large hole in the ground at the Puma Bli Bli service station on Monday.

Heavy rain late last year flooded a pit where underground fuel tanks were stored and caused two of them to move out of place.

The damage has delayed the service station's reopening as soil and water from the pit was found to be contaminated and needed to be disposed in accordance with environment guidelines.

Man caught on CCTV dumping rubbish outside business

Activate your free Courier Mail subscription for big rewards

A Department of Environment and Science spokesman said its representatives inspected the Diddillibah site on November 12 last year and wrote to the service station's operator, Chevron Australia Downstream, to make clear its expectations regarding the works.

He said the department received a response from a contaminated land consultant, acting on behalf of Chevron who said there was hydrocarbon contamination of the soil around the old fuel tanks which would be removed to a landfill that was licenced to accept it.

"The groundwater and stormwater accumulated in the pit has also been impacted with hydrocarbons and consequently has been removed by tankers for treatment as it is a regulated waste under the Queensland environmental legislation," the department spokesman said.

"The current operator is undertaking a program of voluntary upgrades to ensure that, in operating the service station, all environmental obligations under the legislation are met."

Extensive works are being carried out at the David Low Way site. Picture: Patrick Woods.
Extensive works are being carried out at the David Low Way site. Picture: Patrick Woods.

A Chevron Australia Downstream spokesman also said the soil from around the fuel tanks and the water from the pit were being removed to licensed landfill or water treatment facilities in adherence with environmental regulations.

"We have kept the regulators informed," the spokesman said.

He said Chevron looked forward to reopening the service station "in the coming weeks".

"When we reopen, customers will have a greater choice of fuels with new pumps added, including E10 petrol which is completely new to this location," he said.

We will also have additional diesel filling positions, including twice as many high flow diesel positions for trucks.

He said the store would be modernised as well.

"We appreciate the community's patience during the maintenance works and look forward to welcoming everyone back when the new and improved Puma Bli Bli reopens."



‘We saw the world differently’: MP opens up on Pisasale era

Premium Content ‘We saw the world differently’: MP opens up on Pisasale era

Former Ipswich MP Rachel Nolan on her clashes with Paul Pisasale

Where the average home now costs more than $1m

Premium Content Where the average home now costs more than $1m

Million dollar club: Where the average home now costs more than $1m

Key Ipswich stories you might have missed

Premium Content Key Ipswich stories you might have missed

Former state MP Rachel Nolan has a point when she says the city is at a vital stage...