Farmers warned of plant dangers

FARMERS in flood-affected areas are being urged to be on the lookout for a new foe in the coming weeks – poisonous plants.

Biosecurity Queensland principal veterinary officer Rick Whittle said toxic plant seeds could have become displaced during recent flooding and

spread easily, prompting new growth in areas previously not infested.

“As plant life starts to regenerate and shoot up in new areas, producers should keep a watchful eye on livestock for any signs of illness and look out for poisonous plants,” Dr Whittle said.

“Producers need to keep an eye out for plants they know are toxic, as well as unusual plants they don't recognise.

“These plants may appear to be harmless to hungry or naive livestock, especially if they are new to a locality, but once ingested they can cause serious problems.”

For more information visit http://www.biosecurity.qld.gov.au  orwww.biosecurity.qld.gov.au or call 13 25 23.



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