Lifestyle

Titanic story for Camira mother of two

Granddaughter of the longest living survivor of the Titanic Dawn Pincott of Camira with Tiffany (centre), 12, and Laura, 17 (no surname - foster kids). Photo: David Nielsen / The Queensland Times
Granddaughter of the longest living survivor of the Titanic Dawn Pincott of Camira with Tiffany (centre), 12, and Laura, 17 (no surname - foster kids). Photo: David Nielsen / The Queensland Times David Nielsen

IT comes up at the dinner table from time to time, but most people close to Dawn Pincott don't know her grandmother survived the Titanic.

Titanic survivor Edith Brown. Photo: Contributed
Titanic survivor Edith Brown. Photo: Contributed Contributed

The Camira mother of two was the granddaughter of one of the oldest living survivors of the Titanic - Edith Haisman (nee Brown).

Mrs Haisman was 15 when her family boarded RMS Titanic in 1912 in Southampton, England.

Her father was taking her and her mother to New York to open a hotel business. Everything they owned, tableware, furnishings and 1000 rolls of bed linen for the new venture was packed into the Titanic's hold.

Mrs Pincott said the night Titanic struck an iceberg on April 14, 1912, haunted her grandmother for the rest of her life.

"She remembered the screams and the noises of the ship falling apart," Mrs Pincott said. "Once the ship sank, there was no sound and the ocean looked like glass.

She remembered the screams and the noises of the ship falling. Once it sank, there was no sound and the ocean looked like glass.

"She had nightmares for years."

In a series of interviews throughout her lifetime, Mrs Haisman gave vivid accounts of what happened during Titanic's final moments. She said her father woke her and her mother, telling them to put on their life jackets and something warm.

On deck, a steward had told them the ship had struck an iceberg, but said it was nothing to worry about.

Mrs Haisman remembered the band playing ragtime music to keep spirits high, while passengers said she's unsinkable, she won't go down.

"No one panicked, they just got up to see what was going on," Mrs Pincott said. "People were still dancing, the band was playing.

"There was ice coming onto the deck from the iceberg. People weren't worried, they were picking it up and putting it in there drinks."

Mrs Haisman's father kissed her and her mother as they boarded Lifeboat 14. She never saw her father again.

"It was women and children first and she said to her father: 'Come with us" and he told them: 'No I will see you in New York'," Mrs Pincott said.

"They were buying a restaurant in New York. They were very wealthy. They had all their belongings on the ship, but nothing was insured."

Mrs Haisman's last memory of her father was of him smoking a cigar and sipping brandy as they were lowered into the lifeboat.

"It was very cold and the lifeboat leaked," Mrs Pincott said. "She could hear screaming and there were dead bodies everywhere, like in the movie.

"Once I watched the movie it became more real to me."

Mrs Haisman later migrated to Australia to live with her 10 children. After a few years in Queensland she moved back to Southampton.

In 1993, Mrs Haisman received a gold watch, thought to be her father's, which had been discovered during a diving expedition on the Titanic wreck.

Three years later, at 99 years of age, she travelled on a cruise ship to the location of the disaster and laid a rose in the Atlantic Ocean where Mrs Haisman last saw her father. Mrs Haisman died in 1997, aged 100.

"Even to this day, I still see my grandmother on TV talking about Titanic," Mrs Pincott said. "I've always wondered why there was such a big interest in the Titanic - there's been lots of disasters over the years but this one seems to have stuck."

I've always wondered why there was such a big interest in the Titanic - there's been lots of disasters over the years but this one seems to have stuck.

Granddaughter of the longest living survivor of the Titanic Dawn Pincott of Camira. Photo: David Nielsen / The Queensland Times
Granddaughter of the longest living survivor of the Titanic Dawn Pincott of Camira. Photo: David Nielsen / The Queensland Times David Nielsen

A piece of the Titanic wreck now sits tucked away in the Pincott home, a reminder of the family's secret.

David Haisman, Mrs Pincott's uncle, last year produced a book about Edith Haisman's story.

"When I was in hospital last year, the anniversary of the Titanic's sinking, I saw her on TV," Mrs Pincott said. "The nurse was talking me and I was telling her: 'Shush, that's my grandmother'."

Topics:  big read opinion titanic



Summer temperatures forecast in wake of spring deluge

Searing heat inland and on the coast is set to test whole of eastern Australia.

Break in clouds, rain pushing temperatures up

Helidon Spa goes to auction: Residents have to leave

45 Kellys Road, Helidon Spa Photo Contributed

Site just east of Toowoomba will go under the hammer next month

Power bills set to soar almost $2000 over next decade

Household power bills would soar almost $200 per year for a decade under federal Labor’s plan for a 50 per cent renewable energy target by 2030. Picture: Supplied

Annual rise in bills could be $285 a year

Local Partners

Registered sex offender escorted from kids venue

Registered child sex offender seen at Time Zone, Caneland on Sunday. He was escorted off site by security.

No campaign's most important SSM claim debunked

The ‘No’ sky writing that appeared in the sky above Melbourne. Picture: AAP Image/Joe Castro) NO ARCHIVING

Homophobes do more damage to children than same-sex parents

Inside Aldi’s new bistro-style restaurant

Inside the new Aldi bistro, which serves three-course meals for AU$12

Diners have been raving about it online

‘When I was skinny, I wanted to kill myself’

Kelly Clarkson at Variety's Power of Women Luncheon earlier this month. Picture: Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP

"I was miserable, like inside and out, for four years of my life."

‘What I want IVF parents to know’

Loren was born in 1994 ... one of Australia’s first IVF babies. Picture: iStock

Loren was one of the first babies in Australia conceived through IVF

Qld scientist's cancer breakthrough points to better tests

Research work at the QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute in Brisbane.

Dozens of new genetic markers for breast cancer discovered

Crash miracle the face of Flying Doctor campaign

SURVIVORS: Maryborough girls(centre) Jade-Elle Brown with her twin sisters and Molly and Ruby.

Molly's photo can be seen in 288 Woolworths and fuel outlets.