Early warning system is a hit

THE Early Warning Network has passed its first test with flying colours.

The warning system has been implemented by the Somerset and Lockyer Valley councils to inform residents about imminent dangerous weather.

In the Lockyer Valley the network issued an alert to more than 400 subscribers less than half an hour after the Bureau of Meteorology issued a severe thunderstorm warning.

Lockyer Valley mayor Steve Jones said there had been a positive response to the implementation of the network.

"So far 193 people have registered through council's website, with the remaining 231 members already registered previously," he said.

The network issues alerts of strong weather to residents based on their location.

Somerset mayor Graeme Lehmann said despite smaller showers than in the Lockyer he had heard positive reports from Somerset residents.

"From talking to some of the people who've signed up for it they've said it was working well," he said.

"They received a warning about the storms before they hit. All is doing what it was supposed to."

The Early Warning Network covers weather events such as hail and severe thunderstorms, destructive winds and floods.

The alerts sent by the EWN service are not intended to provide a widespread 'general' type alert and instead are targeted to areas that are specifically expected to be affected by an event.

The network can be subscribed to at the Lockyer Valley and Somerset councils' websites.



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