BROTHERS IN ARMS: Marion (left) and Ben Seve celebrate Marion’s success on the footy field this season, having spent 2012 fighting testicular cancer.
BROTHERS IN ARMS: Marion (left) and Ben Seve celebrate Marion’s success on the footy field this season, having spent 2012 fighting testicular cancer. David Nielsen

From fight for life to national honour

A YEAR ago, Marion Seve was battling cancer in the fight of his life.

This week the teenager from Redbank Plains played a lead role in the biggest game of schoolboys rugby league in the state this year.

His appearance for Keebra Park High School in the GIO Cup Queensland final against St Brendan's College followed his selection in the Australian Schoolboys rugby league team to play New Zealand next month.

But competitive footy was a long way from his thoughts 12 months ago when he had just finished chemotherapy.

It was early in 2012 Marion was diagnosed with cancer, after being told to see a doctor by his footy trainer while at a representative carnival.

The prognosis was not good, with stage three cancer having spread to his liver.

It called for immediate surgery followed by an intense course of chemotherapy.

"I was shocked," Seve said. "But I knew I was going to beat it.

"I didn't really think about it being bad.

"I stayed positive."

For that he has his family to thank.

They helped him through the treatment and with his recovery.

"It was pretty scary, my first chemo," Seve said.

"Because I didn't really know about it."

The first bout of chemo led to Seve being placed in isolation for two weeks because his white blood-cell count dropped so low.

As he got used to the treatment and his condition stabilised, Seve's family provided him with the support to stay positive.

Between bouts of chemo, his big brother Ben, who plays on the wing for Brothers in the Ipswich Rugby League, would take Marion to the park or gym to try and lift his spirits.

"He couldn't walk 10m without getting tired," Ben said.

"When I took him for his first weights session, after 10 minutes he was in the bathroom throwing up."

The physical debilitation wasn't the only side-effect of the chemo treatment.

Marion was forced to take anti-psychotic medication because the chemo messed with his head.

So much so that he remembers little of the time.

By the time of his last round of chemo, he was struggling to maintain his positive attitude.

"I was depressed," he said.

"But my family helped me.

"Their support helped me a lot."

It was at the end of last footy season, while his Brothers teammates were celebrating 'Mad Monday', that Marion got the news he was waiting for.

His final scans showed he was in remission and he could resume his normal life.

The boost he got from returning to health, the strength he gained from winning his fight and the perspective it gave him are partly behind his subsequent footy success.

He found his inner-strength and now has a greater sense of what he is capable of.

It he can beat cancer, he knows footy is a walk in the park in comparison.

"I'm grateful for the opportunity," Seve said of his selection for Australian Schoolboys.

"I'm anxious to play for Australia.

"Being ill has made me more determined to strive for my goals now."

Inspirational Player

  • Marion Seve
  • Position: Centr, wing, fullback
  • Club: Brothers/ Wests Tigers
  • Favourite player: Greg Inglis
  • Biggest influence: Brother Ben. Since I was little he's given me heaps of tips.


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