Lifestyle

Photo uncovers life of former QT reporter who died in France

GREAT SCOTT: An image of Lieutenant Charles Scott that came to light in a Picture Ipswich military photo drive.
GREAT SCOTT: An image of Lieutenant Charles Scott that came to light in a Picture Ipswich military photo drive. Contributed

THE life of former Queensland Times reporter Charles Scott has come to light in a focus on military images on Picture Ipswich.

Charles Douglas Livingstone Scott was born in Ipswich in 1890 to parents William and Beatrice.

The family home was in Waghorn St and he had three brothers - Robert, twins Alexander and William and sister Beatrice.

In his family tree is Alexander Scott who started Scott's Foundry.

Charles played rugby league for Starlights as a forward and represented Ipswich, Queensland (1911 and 1913) and Australia against England, New South Wales and New Zealand in matches played in Brisbane.

About the age of 10 he moved to live with his aunt and he went to Peak Crossing School.

He was a splendid shot, a fine swimmer and a good horseman.

He began working as a copy boy for Ipswich City Council in 1906 and received a fountain pen when he left in October 1908.

Charles's next job was as a reporter with the Queensland Times before he became a senior reporter for The Courier in 1914.

Charles enlisted into the army on August 22, 1914, and did his training at the Enoggera and joined the 2nd Light Horse Regiment. Trooper Charles Scott became a corporal and served as an infantryman at Gallipoli.

He became a sergeant in the 47th Battalion and was then transferred to another unit and dispatched to the French frontier.

By 1917 Charles had been promoted to second lieutenant and was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal.

On June 7, 1917, Lieutenant Charles Douglas Livingstone Scott was killed in action on the fields of Messines, Belgium, aged 26.

Ipswich councillor David Pahlke said the investigations into Lt Scott's wartime experience had also uncovered significant memorabilia from other soldiers.

"With Anzac Day commemorations this year, considerable efforts have been made to trace members of Lt Scott's family," Cr Pahlke said.

"However, there has been no success in tracing a living family member to date."

 

Website delivers a snapshot of our city

PICTURE Ipswich has proven its worth many times over since it was launched in March 2008.

Ipswich City Council tourism and libraries committee chairman David Pahlke said the online database held a record of the city's historical photographs and documents.

"Picture Ipswich now contains more than 10,000 images, depicting everyday life and historic events of Ipswich during the past 150 years," Cr Pahlke said.

"It is an accessible record of the history of Ipswich through images and stories of its people, families, places, events and way of life and since its launch in May 2008, has become increasingly popular with the wider community.

"As a timely reminder of Ipswich's role in world history and to commemorate the centenary of the beginning of the First World War, a photographic drive is under way to collect images and memorabilia from the First World War.

"Picture Ipswich has many images of people who fought and returned, or paid the supreme sacrifice."

Cr Pahlke said the recent photo appeal had yielded more than 300 photographs, and he thanked the community for its support of the important photo drive.

"Your contribution is helping to build a wonderful resource for the future that will provide a comprehensive window into the past."

To provide photos to Picture Ipswich call the council's digital archivist on 3810 7272 or email pictureipswich@library.ipswich. qld.gov.au. Picture Ipswich can be accessed at picture.ipswich. qld.gov.au

Topics:  anzac day charles scott picture ipswich



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