PROUD: Brett Kleinschmidt has worked at Ipswich City Council for more than 40 years. One of his favourite projects was designing d'Arcy Doyle Place (pictured behind).
PROUD: Brett Kleinschmidt has worked at Ipswich City Council for more than 40 years. One of his favourite projects was designing d'Arcy Doyle Place (pictured behind). Rob Williams

Designer has fingerprints all over Ipswich city

BRETT Kleinschmidt finds choosing a favourite project he has designed is akin to picking a favourite child.

He has worked as a senior civil designer at Ipswich City Council for more than 40 years.

Mr Kleinschmidt has either designed or played an integral part in many major projects across Ipswich.

The 58-year-old has his fingerprints all over the original Ipswich City Mall, d'Arcy Doyle Place, One Mile Bridge, the Redbank Plains Rd upgrade and plenty more.

"After all of your effort, you get the reward of seeing it get built, then so many people getting the benefit from it,” Mr Kleinschmidt.

"Just to get the recognition, it's magnificent.”

He often travels past one of his own creations during his commutes.

"Or if someone's in the car with me, I (can point and say) 'that's mine',” he said.

He started a cadetship at council fresh from school and studied in Brisbane at the old Queensland Institute of Technology three nights a week while working full time during the day.

In the early days of his career, drawing boards with slide rules, set squares, French curves, scale rules, clutch pencils and ink pens were used to meticulously design plans.

A scalpel was needed back then to erase the ink from tracing paper if a mistake was made.

It was often easier to throw the plan away and begin again.

The very first programmable calculator used for geometric calculations was the size of a typewriter and wheeled around the office for everyone to share.

The vast majority of the work is now done on a computer and modern programs allow designers to focus on the design rather than the tedious plotting and tracing.

His work is all across the city, having helped design kerbs, intersections, carparks, sewerage, boat ramps and toilet blocks.

He says Ipswich has retained its "country town feel” but he has seen the city grow significantly and get busier over the years.

Mr Kleinschmidt has lived in Ipswich since he was 12 and rides his push bike to work each and every day.

But a quick visit to the Brisbane gridlock always makes him feel a little better.

"(Ipswich is) getting there and it's probably my fault,” he laughed.

"Everything is going to progress and what we're doing is trying to make it more convenient to get around.”



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