DEAD KOALA: A Collingwood Park resident found this dead koala while out for his usual morning walk. He wants the body examined to determine its cause of death.
DEAD KOALA: A Collingwood Park resident found this dead koala while out for his usual morning walk. He wants the body examined to determine its cause of death.

Dead koala found in Ipswich residential development area

A DEAD koala has been found at Collingwood Park.

Mitch Dodrill was out for his usual morning walk through the bushland this morning, along with his 19-year-old grandson, when he made the discovery near a development area.

He said they examined the body and couldn't see any obvious signs as to what had led to the koala's death.

This is the second time in two years Mr Dodrill has stumbled across a dead koala and he wants the body of this one professionally examined to determine why it died.

For 40 years Mr Dodrill has lived in the area and said he's noticed a lot of movement in the local koala populations as trees are cleared to make way for housing.

The area is one of two that have been at the centre of a public campaign by Ipswich Ratepayers and Residents Association, headed up by Mr Dodrill's son Jim Dodrill, calling on authorities to do more to protect the vulnerable animals.

"I have been walking through the bushland here every day for the past 15 years," Mitch Dodrill said.

"This is a corridor where koalas have moved freely over many years and all of a sudden vast areas of land have been cleared.

"I believe the body should be examined and the reason for its death officially established.

"It's a hard thing to see, a dead koala, and nobody seems to care (about the impact on koalas due to the loss of habitat from land clearing)."

DEAD KOALA: A Collingwood Park resident found this dead koala while out for his usual morning walk. He wants the body examined to determine its cause of death.
DEAD KOALA: A Collingwood Park resident found this dead koala while out for his usual morning walk. He wants the body examined to determine its cause of death.

Ipswich City Council has previously come under fire for allowing large scale land clearing, approved by the State Government, in the areas of Collingwood and Bellbird Park.

>>New technology will save Ipswich koalas from land clearing

>>New development brings up serious koala concern

>>Land clearing: Hundreds sign petition to 'save koalas'

In earlier statements the council said 27.1 per cent of the land within the council area, or about 296 km sq, has been set aside as protected green space in conservation, recreation and buffer zones.

Developers are also required to replant trees in a 'one-for-one' policy.

In December, the council said no clearing had occurred in key areas of Happy Jack Gully and Woogaroo Creek and pointed to the Federal Government as being ultimately responsible for koala protection.

"The Australian Government, having principal responsibility for protection of koala species, has granted approval for the works under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act," Planning and Development chair Andrew Antoniolli said in a written statement, in December.

Ipswich Ratepayers and Residents Association has repeatedly called on the council to open a discussion on how development approvals can be changed to better protect valuable bushland and native species. 



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