OPINION: Dangerous dogs must be registered

I KNEW there were lots of dogs in Ipswich, but to find out that we have around 40,000 stunned me.

At least that's the figure Ipswich Council gave us yesterday, after we launched an investigation into determining how many dangerous dogs we may have lurking in our suburban backyards.

They told us that almost 30,000 dogs were registered and an estimated 10,000 weren't.

While this may sound like a dog registration crisis, a 75% success rate is in fact on par with what most other councils have achieved.

The concern for residents is how many of these unregistered dogs are dangerous breeds.

To keep these types of dogs, owners need to adhere to specific rules which basically say keep your dog securely locked up and off the street.

That wasn't the case in Eastern Heights last week, when Grace Preston had her precious pet dog of seven years killed in front of her eyes by a crazed dog.

Her story created an amazing reaction on our website and many watched the online video in which she recounted that nightmare afternoon.

I applaud her for speaking up. It would have been easy for Grace to have said nothing about the incident, but she decided that her heartbreaking story should serve as a warning to all dog owners of their responsibilities.

Around nine years ago I went out with my family to a small farm at Boonah and purchased a small Maltese terrier for my daughter's birthday.

That dog has become part of my family and the thought that he could be killed in such a manner sickens me.

If you know of someone who has a dangerous dog and it's not registered, give the council a call and do us all a favour.



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