Do motorists really need a law that forces them to safely share the road?
Do motorists really need a law that forces them to safely share the road? Erle Levey

Cyclists, motorists and common sense ... oh my

TO SAY that cyclists and motorists often share an uneasy relationship on the road is an understatement.

As with any groups at loggerheads, both parties can, and often do, point to the other side's failings, often while excusing the behaviour of their own black sheep.

Joe Fitzgerald.
Joe Fitzgerald.

We all know the stereotypes. Cyclists are slow, don't obey road rules and wear silly outfits. Motorists are aggressive, fast and too busy texting to notice anyone else on the road. 

So when the State Government ordered a review into Queensland's cycling laws last week, you can imagine the verbal barbs being traded.

The review will focus on whether cyclists should have to pay rego and whether motorists should observe a one-metre gap when overtaking.

Some motorists think that since cyclists use the road they should have to pay registration. That sounds great in theory but raises a number of issues.

Firstly, most cyclists also own a car and therefore already pay their share of rego. If they're on their bike, it's one less vehicle causing congestion.

Secondly, what about children who ride bikes to school, do they need to be registered? Do we really want to discourage kids riding their bikes? Or put more financial strain on families?

Do motorists really need a law that forces them to safely share the road?

In the end, as with most things, the application of common sense would eliminate the need to have this discussion. But you know what they say about common sense…



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