Journalist Kathy Sundstrom gets hit in the neck by a magpie while investigating regular magpie attacks in Aroona.
Journalist Kathy Sundstrom gets hit in the neck by a magpie while investigating regular magpie attacks in Aroona. Iain Curry

Kathy meets with magpies, and has the mark to show for it

IT came out of nowhere and whacked me on the side of head.

Hours later and where its beak, or maybe its claws, had penetrated, it was still sore.

There is no way I would go back there. Thankfully I won't have to.

But for the hundreds of people that live near the small Aroona corner shop and childcare centre, it isn't an option.

They have to walk to their post box, their takeaway, their hairdresser - an area that's home to a rogue magpie.

>> WHY THEY'RE IN A FLAP AT AROONA

They say only 9% of magpies swoop and I have never been swooped before.

The experience, however, has left me shaken.

I thought it was clear; never heard it coming, never saw it, but I sure felt it.

My colleague, photographer Iain Curry, also made the "walk of terror" in the hopes I could get a photograph of him being swooped.

Well, maybe that bird is sexist!

He escaped unscathed.



So you think you don’t need a bushfire survival plan?

premium_icon So you think you don’t need a bushfire survival plan?

Think again. Recent fire events have caused concern and fire crews are pleading...

New administrator to continue transformational reform

premium_icon New administrator to continue transformational reform

Steve Greenwood, who will take over as interim administrator and says his core...

Everything you need to know about Ipswich’s measles outbreak

premium_icon Everything you need to know about Ipswich’s measles outbreak

Deaths occur mainly in children under five years of age, primarily from pneumonia...