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"Crazy" not to change the clocks: Ipswich mayor

IT’S TIME: Mayor Paul Pisasale is keen for daylight saving in south-east Queensland.
IT’S TIME: Mayor Paul Pisasale is keen for daylight saving in south-east Queensland. Sarah Harvey

IPSWICH mayor Paul Pisasale has joined the growing chorus of Queensland mayors demanding daylight saving be reconsidered for the state's south-east corner.

A formal e-petition calling for a south-east Queensland trial has now garnered more than 16,000 signatures and reignited the summer time debate.

Cr Pisasale said daylight saving should be reintroduced in order to stay in sync with the rest of Australia's eastern coast.

He said it was "crazy" to have the east coast of Australia on different time zones and the switch to daylight saving would be a positive move for Ipswich.

"It's a no-brainer," he said. "We live in the Sunshine State; let's utilise these extra hours of sunlight."

The mayor said he believed many Ipswich residents shared his view because it created too many hassles having the clocks out of step with NSW and Victoria.

"The issue is affecting business meetings, race meetings, television and radio programming - the whole thing is out of sync," he said.

Cr Pisasale's standpoint has been echoed with public support for daylight savings from fellow mayors in Brisbane and on the Gold Coast.

The petitioned time-zone change would not affect the clocks of those beyond Queensland's southern centres.

But both Premier Campbell Newman and Opposition Leader Annastacia Palaszczuk have said daylight saving for Queensland was not a priority.

State Member for Ipswich West Sean Choat agreed.

"There are a million other things we need to address before daylight saving - like our health system and the cost of living," Mr Choat said.

"Personally I disagree with daylight saving - we already have more than enough daylight during the summer months.

"But if more people in Ipswich West were to approach me and said they wanted daylight saving, I would have to go with them because that is my job."

Bundamba MP Jo-Ann Miller was the manager of the daylight saving inquiry which took place in Queensland more than two decades ago.

Mrs Miller said many people in the south-east corner had - in the past - not only wanted to be one-hour ahead but actually supported a two-hour switch.

"Personally I think daylight saving offers some great health and lifestyle benefits, particularly for young, working families," she said.

"However, I respect the Labor view which is that we - at this stage - don't support daylight saving being an issue."

Queensland briefly observed daylight saving between 1989 and 1992. A referendum to make the move permanent was defeated.

"If the mayors and local government really believe daylight saving is important for their communities, they should conduct a referendum in accordance with the Local Government Act," Mrs Miller said.

But Cr Pisasale said he didn't want to waste time and money by holding a referendum.

"Let's just do it; let's put it on a trial period and see what it's like," he said.

A State Government spokesperson said the LNP had given an election commitment that daylight saving would not be brought in and it was standing by that commitment.

Topics:  daylight savings mayor paul pisasale



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