Flowers at the spot where Ivan Sthrowski-Wood was struck.
Flowers at the spot where Ivan Sthrowski-Wood was struck.

Crash site magpie moved on

AN aggressive magpie which could have contributed to the death of a Walloon schoolboy has been relocated.

Ivan Sthrowski-Wood died late Monday night as a result of injuries he received after running into the path of a car on Queen Street, Walloon on August 16.

While family members, including Ivan’s grandmother Ivy McClements, blamed a swooping magpie for the tragedy, authorities said they had not found evidence to back-up the claim.

Police are still investigating the cause of the accident and a report is being prepared for the coroner.

Nevertheless, Member for Ipswich West Wayne Wendt said he’d responded to a complaint from a Queen Street resident and acted to have a problem magpie in the area relocated.

Mr Wendt said National Parks and Wildlife, as well as local residents and business owners, were consulted before the magpie was considered aggressive enough to be moved away. “The bird was located on a private property behind Queen Street – it was creating a nuisance and was removed the next working day,” Mr Wendt said.

Private contractors undertook the job of catching and relocating the magpie on August 30.

Queenslanders have been urged to look out for swooping magpies during the peak of the breeding season, which usually lasts from August until November.

Male magpies are responsible for 99 per cent of swooping and their defence zone is usually within a 100m radius of the nesting tree.

Mr Wendt said people should avoid areas inhabited by nesting magpies if possible.

“If you must enter the area, move through it quickly, but don’t run,” Mr Wendt said.

“Wear a hat and sunglasses or carry an umbrella. Cyclists should dismount and walk through the magpies’ territory.” Many cyclists have also used cable ties – tied on to the back of the helmet to stick up like antennae – as a useful deterrent to protective magpies.

Ms Jones said DERM did not remove magpies but could provide details of licensed contractors who would do so in certain situations.

More information is available at www.derm.qld.gov.au or by calling 1300 130 372.
 

Magpie season
Male magpies are responsible for most attacks. The breeding season for magpies correlates with the growth of the testes in the male, when an increased amount of testosterone pumps through his body. Magpies are aggressive only when the male is protecting chicks.



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