Aaron Finch has his castle rattled in the first innings. Picture: AAP
Aaron Finch has his castle rattled in the first innings. Picture: AAP

Craddock: Rotten batting roots exposed by ugly statistic

Hidden behind the plaudits which came with a rousing last day finish lay the sobering statistic that said everything about Australia's potholed road ahead.

Australia's highest partnership of the Test was 50 - between Pat Cummins and Travis Head.

Even if your tail wags like a hungry dog's at dinner time you can't win Test matches against India when you bat like that.

For the first time in 70 years of touring Australia, India can look the world in the eye and say they are the better team and will win the series if they play to their potential.

 

The team which used to have lounge chairs and cups of tea at training are so committed that 30 minutes after the match was won, opening batsman KL Rahul was where he has been after all five days after play - in the nets.

All of Australia's traditional advantages - fitness, superior fast bowlers, fearless batsmen and powerful invisible aura - have been negated.

 

Australia's magical aura is gone but it must be said India lacks one away from home as well.

They were nervous and just starting to fluff their lines on Monday when the big moment came.

A loss would have crushed them. A win has surely emboldened them.

For once a touring team to Australia has landed here and not got over-excited about the bounce.

 

Peter Handscomb walks from the field after being dismissed on day four. Picture: AP
Peter Handscomb walks from the field after being dismissed on day four. Picture: AP

 

India bowled as well in Adelaide as they did in any Test they have played here in 30 years.

Australia feels vulnerable in the short and long term and so it should for options are limited.

Not one batsmen in genuine contention for national honours has managed two Sheffield Shield centuries this summer.

There is no such person as an unlucky batsmen in Australia.

Australia is caught in a no man's land where the first generation of players to have been seduced by the Big Bash are caught between preparing a burger and chips technique for the short game or the fine dining experience of Test cricket.

Australia is stocked with first class batsmen who average between 33 and 37 in Sheffield Shield matches and have a first and fourth gear but not much in between.

The competitions have moved ahead of the coaching textbook. Maybe it will never catch up because the game does not really want to.

Australia coaching methods for six to eight year olds involve freeing the arms and belting the ball - great for 

Pujara showed the Aussies how to bat. Picture: AAP
Pujara showed the Aussies how to bat. Picture: AAP

engagement numbers but no so good when you are looking for a homegrown version of batting barnacle Cheteshwar Pujara.

The price of Australia's Big Bash boom is that Australia has missed a generation of Test match batsmen.

Not since 2007 - when they beat England in a series in England - have India had a big time scalp overseas in a full series but they have been working up to the moment.

This year they have pulled off a notable trifecta of winning Tests in South Africa, England and Australia.

 

Even though they lost series they gained a measure of confidence which they have brought to our shores.

Australia beware.

India have had the confidence boost they have been craving for decades and will be even more dangerous in Perth than they were in Adelaide.

 

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