One of the new local laws announced this week by Cr Paul Tully and his colleagues will compel shopping centres to fit wheel locks to shopping trolleys.
One of the new local laws announced this week by Cr Paul Tully and his colleagues will compel shopping centres to fit wheel locks to shopping trolleys. David Nielsen

Council slashing city's local laws

DO YOU know there used to be a law against playing a mouth organ in a park in Ipswich?

Or that it was against the law to ring a doorbell for no reason?

And did you know the Ipswich Mayor used to have the final say on whether or not a bathing suit was too brief to wear at a public pool?

These local laws - or bylaws as they used to be called - were phased out years ago of course.

But Ipswich City Council has undertaken a major review of the city's local laws.

"The State Government has an ongoing process of reviewing laws and we need to review our local laws on a regular basis," Cr Paul Tully said.

The latest council review has pared back the local laws from more than 30 to eight new laws and two continuing laws.

Two of the new local laws announced this week will make it an offence to smoke in public places in Ipswich and compel shopping centres to fit wheel locks to shopping trolleys.

The new laws come into effect on August 1 except the trolley lock law, which comes into effect on July 1 next year.

"Starting on August 1 this year we'll be able to give a direction to a retailer to retrieve trolleys and if we give that direction in writing, they've got up to two days otherwise they can be fined," Cr Tully said.

When he was elected in 1979, the bylaws dated back to 1962.

"One of them made it an offence to play a mouth organ in a park, another made it an offence to ring a person's doorbell without a reasonable excuse," he said.

"When we amalgamated with Moreton Shire Council in 1995 and John Nugent wanted a briefing about the new local laws, which were an amalgam of Moreton Shire local laws and Ipswich local laws, I told him about a bylaw in those days that related to modesty at public pools.

"The manager of the public pool could make a decision as to whether a person needed to leave the pool area because their bathing costume was too brief.

"And the bylaw actually made provisions that if there was any dispute the mayor could arrive and make a decision."



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