HANGING AROUND: The Ipswich City Council will review its flying-fox management plan to minimise the effect of the bats on residents in Yamanto and Bundamba.
HANGING AROUND: The Ipswich City Council will review its flying-fox management plan to minimise the effect of the bats on residents in Yamanto and Bundamba. Contributed

Council puts flying-fox colonies in its crosshairs

THE management of flying-foxes across the city will be reviewed with a series of small colonies causing problems for residents.

Previously-cleared weeds at Deebing Creek have returned, allowing a colony of bats to re-establish.

A complaint from a resident prompted Ipswich councillors to discuss how to best manage bat colonies across the city.

At Deebing Creek in 2016 the Ipswich City Council spent $60,000 to remove vegetation around the creek and on neighbouring residents' private land.

Councillors were told most of those residents then failed to maintain the clearing as agreed and the flying foxes had returned.

With bats due to breed in the next few months, the Ipswich City Council moved to get on top of the expected noise and faeces issue.

In a whole-of-city approach to flying foxes, its management strategy will be reviewed to include minor plans for monitoring known colonies.

Rather than respond to the Deebing Creek problem, councillors will also monitor colonies at Queen's Park and in Bundamba.

Councillors were handed a range of options to manage the colonies, including actively moving them to another location, installing sprinklers or extending the buffer between residents and colonies.

The council's report acknowledged "no one option is likely to be 100 per cent effective at reducing the direct and indirect impacts of roosting flying-foxes".

Environment committee chair Kerry Silver warned her colleagues about repercussions if colonies were relocated.

"We need to manage them but realise no matter what, they go somewhere else," she said.

"They're an essential part of our environment.

"Quite frankly, they were there before many of us."

To manage the colonies, councillors agreed to subsidise residents for the removal of vegetation.



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