Michelle Cull from Queensland Urban Utilities is encouraging Ipswich residents to conserve water, as dam levels drop back towards a combined 60 per cent.
Michelle Cull from Queensland Urban Utilities is encouraging Ipswich residents to conserve water, as dam levels drop back towards a combined 60 per cent.

Conservation call as dam levels approach trigger point

THOSE few welcome drops of rain that blessed Ipswich through the winter have not been enough to keep concerns over dropping dam levels at bay.

Combined dam levels are dropping back towards 60 per cent - the trigger point for Seqwater to start its drought response plan - and are about 4.5 per cent lower than the same time last year.

The situation has prompted Urban Utilities to promote water conservation in the home and garden, with a new campaign encouraging residents to cut back on shower time, fix leaking taps and reduce wastage in the dunny.

Urban Utilities spokeswoman Michelle Cull said cutting back on consumption could be done in practical ways.

"While we all need to maintain behaviours like washing hands regularly during the COVID-19 pandemic, there are lots of other ways to save water around the home and garden," she said.

"One of the biggest winter water-wasters is spending too long in the shower to warm yourself up.

"About 50 per cent of our customers admit to having showers longer than four minutes on at least four occasions per week.

"By reducing your shower time from seven minutes to four minutes you can save 27 litres of water per person per day."

 

Nine-year-old George Crombie is the ambassador for the 'How Low Can You Go
Nine-year-old George Crombie is the ambassador for the 'How Low Can You Go" campaign to conserve water.

 

The face of the 'How low can you go?' challenge is nine-year-old George Crombie, who is encouraging everyone at his place to be a H2O hero.

"I turn the tap off while I'm brushing my teeth so I don't waste water and I have super-fast showers," he said.

"I also remember to always use the half-flush button on the toilet for wees and save the full flush for poos."

Ms Cull said water usage in southeast Queensland was about 150 litres per person per day.

Despite the pandemic requiring people to wash their hands frequently, she said there had not been a noticeable increase in water consumption.

The average consumption this time last year was about 170 litres per person per day.



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