CULTURAL FOUNDATION: Jack Beeston-Ryan, 8, and Clayton Robertson, 13, from the Goodna State School dance troupe help open the Australian Indigenous College at Goodna.
CULTURAL FOUNDATION: Jack Beeston-Ryan, 8, and Clayton Robertson, 13, from the Goodna State School dance troupe help open the Australian Indigenous College at Goodna. Brian Bennion

Australian Indigenous College is open to big plans

A RUSH on enrolments turned the official opening of the Australian Indigenous College at Goodna on Friday into an even bigger celebration of culture.

Another first for Ipswich, the college was already talking of expanding as a chain, with a second campus on the cards for February.

Opened in August the first college campus at St Ives shopping centre, Goodna had more than 100 people lodge expressions of interest in the Diploma of Business.

The official opening was an emotional day for National Training and Development district team leader Kylie Hill who saw her dream become a reality as more than 250 guests helped the college open its doors in true style.

"I am very passionate about helping and encouraging our people to get an education," Mrs Hill said. "I believe that it is really important to keep our culture alive, respected and to acknowledge each other where we all belong before we conduct business relationships with each other."

Australian Indigenous College national manager Annette Simpson attributed the college's early success to the unique teaching model.

"It's the delivery method," Ms Simpson said.

"It's bringing it back to culture and community and kinship and country so that people have a better understanding and they put it into the context of their learning.

"When we talk to them about their study, we talk to them about what they're passionate about, their business idea, so we focus on that.

One of the philosophies is student focus, passion base, so we work on what they are passionate about and that's how we get them to maintain their interest."

The college operates under what it calls an eight-way learning method which incorporates story-telling, community links, non-verbal and learning maps.

After consulting with the traditional owners of the Goodna area, the Elders of Jagera, Yuggera and Ugurapul people signed a charter that showed their support of the college, its concepts and values.

For more information go to http://www.myaic.com.au or phone 1300 043 623.



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