For Brynhyfryd: the lost castle of Blackstone Hill, the Ipswich Art Gallery has found objects scattered across Ipswich since the building's demise in the 1930s.
For Brynhyfryd: the lost castle of Blackstone Hill, the Ipswich Art Gallery has found objects scattered across Ipswich since the building's demise in the 1930s.

Coal King's castle brought back to life

THE exhibition showcasing items from the "Coal King's" mansion Brynhyfryd has opened at Ipswich Art Gallery.

The lost mansion of Brynhyfryd was one of the most imposing buildings in Ipswich of its time.

Built in 1889 as the family residence of Lewis Thomas, his wife Ann and daughter Mary, Brynhyfryd was known locally as "Blackstone Castle".

By the 1930s the contents and building were put up for public auction and dispersed throughout Ipswich and further afield.

The exhibition Brynhyfryd:lost castle of Blackstone Hill brings together a collection of objects from Brynhyfryd, including family heirlooms, furniture, and parts of the building retrieved from the demolition.

While hundreds of items were sold in the auctions of the 1930s, the small number of objects presented in this exhibition have managed to retain the stories of their links to life at Brynhyfryd.

The exhibition is free and runs until August 9 from 10am-5pm daily.

 



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