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City salute for Reserve Forces Day

FALLEN REMEMBERED: People at the commemoration service pause for the minute’s silence to reflect on the fallen.
FALLEN REMEMBERED: People at the commemoration service pause for the minute’s silence to reflect on the fallen. Sarah Harvey

IPSWICH paused to recognise the region's reserve forces on Saturday.

The city, with its long connections to the defence forces, paid its respects at the RSL Memorial Gardens.

Mayor Paul Pisasale said it was vital to recognise the role of all members of the defence forces, especially those who had put their hands up to be part of the reserves.

"The reserves are an integral part of the Australian Defence Force," he said.

"It is important for us to show our appreciation of reservists and recognise the commitment they make to the defence and security of our nation."

The ceremony started with an opening introduction from Rob Wadley from the Reserve Forces Day Committee of South Queensland.

Committee chairman Air Commodore Stewart Cameron addressed the crowd, speaking of the vital role reservists play in the defence force.

Reserve Forces Day is celebrated across Australia and is the annual recognition for serving and former members with 1.25 million Australians having served in the nation's reserve forces.

The inaugural Reserve Forces Day in 1998 celebrated the 50th anniversary of the reforming of the Citizen Military Forces after World War II on July 1, 1948 and reserve service.

Saturday's ceremony fell on the 100th anniversary of the 1914 assassination of Austrian Archduke Franz Ferdinand, which launched the First World War.

Topics:  reserve forces day



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