Childcare change that could save you $2200

 

 

PARENTS could avoid a future increase of $43 per week in childcare costs if the Queensland government commits to five-year universal funding for all centre-based kindergartens, according to the peak body for early learning services.

The Australian Childcare Alliance Queensland (ACA QLD) has today called on the two major political parties vying for power to commit to a raft of policies that would provide what they say Queensland parents want, and what their children need.

The peak childcare body is calling for changes to the current funding model. Picture: John McCutcheon
The peak childcare body is calling for changes to the current funding model. Picture: John McCutcheon

 

A key election commitment calls on the incoming state government to extend the current yearly funding model to five years for all four-year-olds in Queensland kindergartens in early learning services.

ACA QLD is calling on the incoming state government to lobby the federal government,

which funds kindergarten programs, to ensure that its annual funding towards universal access is instead locked-in for five years.

ACA Qld president Majella Fitzsimmons said the state government determines how each kindergarten-aged child receives that funding.

She said the state government must continue with the funding model it has amid worries that it will go to state school operated services.

According to ACA QLD, this would save parents from being either forced to withdraw their child from their service or face increased costs of about $43 a week amid uncertainty about a services' future.

ACA Qld president Majella Fitzsimmons said neither of those options were acceptable and shouldn't be to any party seeking power.

"At a time of deep and traumatic disruption to their daily lives, Queensland families, and children, in particular, should not be forced to endure more unnecessary disruption and uncertainty," Ms Fitzsimmons said.

 

ACA Qld president Majella Fitzsimmons.
ACA Qld president Majella Fitzsimmons.

She said early learning services had been the bedrock of the Queensland economy, particularly during the height of the shocking health and economic crisis caused by COVID-19.

The other policy calls include extending the existing KindyLinQ program, which funds free pre-kindy programs in some state schools to all early learning services instead to allow parents choice.

And permanently waiving payroll tax for all services in a bid to allow increased employment of educators.

Another policy calls for the introduction of a needs-based location rules model to reduce the oversupply of services which leads to hikes in costs to families, taxpayers and government.

"On behalf of all of Queensland families, we are committing cost effective policies for the next government to adopt," Ms Fitzsimmons said.

"These policies look beyond the current COVID-19 crisis, to build a stronger future for our families, the communities in which they live and the economy of the state.

"This will support women to return to the workforce because if you don't have childcare, the majority of the time women will be the ones who stay home to look after the child."

Originally published as Childcare change that could save you $2200



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