WHEN it comes to catching a bull shark in the Bremer, a whipper snipper might be an important piece of gear to factor in.

As someone who has reeled in dozens of baby bullies over the years, Ipswich father Jason Reeve reckons the little predators are so common in our neck of the woods, all you need is some cheap fishing gear and a neat track down to the river bank.

Mr Reeve hit one of his favourite haunts at East Ipswich on Friday afternoon after getting a few bites on Thursday.

He has caught sharks up to 1.5m at Colleges Crossing and Kookaburra Park on the Brisbane River, and at North Booval on the mighty Bremer, and said summer was the time to catch them.

 

Jason Reeve caught this 110cm bull shark near the Mt Crosby Weir in 2014.
Jason Reeve caught this 110cm bull shark near the Mt Crosby Weir in 2014. Contributed

"In the past I have been able to catch two or three each time I go out," he said.

"They can be quite brazen and not much will spook them."

Although he has a choice rig that he uses for bull shark fishing, Mr Reeve said you could just as easily target them with a $40 Kmart rod.

His rig uses 15 pound main line with a 60 pound mono leader, followed by a 60 pound wire trace.

He recommended a 6/0 or 7/0 round hook and usedlocally caught eel for bait.

He said the trick to hooking a bull shark was to hold off striking until after the shark had grabbed the bait and run with it.

 

ON THE BITE: Jason Reeve catches bull sharks in the Bremer and Brisbane rivers.
ON THE BITE: Jason Reeve catches bull sharks in the Bremer and Brisbane rivers. Rob Williams

"They will grab the bait and can run more than 100m before they actually swallow it," he said.

"It took me five or six sharks to realise that.

"The largest I have caught is 1.5m, which I believe is about as big as they get before they start to head out into Moreton Bay.

"I caught a 90cm here at East Ipswich six weeks ago."

Ocean and Coast Research shark expert Jonathan Werry previously told the QT that river systems such as the Brisbane and Bremer were used by bull sharks as nurseries for the young.

About November, large females will swim many kilometres upstream, where they "drop off" newborn pups then swim back out into the ocean.

Of the adults, only female sharks have been tracked so far upstream, and it is thought they may stay inland for only a matter of hours before returning to saltwater.

Dr Werry said he did not recommend swimming anywhere that sharks were present, but that those who did should avoid swimming at dusk and dawn, and in murky water, where a shark could mistake hands or feet for a tasty mullet.

A 1.3m bull shark that Jason Reeve caught at Colleges Crossing in November, 2015.
A 1.3m bull shark that Jason Reeve caught at Colleges Crossing in November, 2015. Contributed


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