FIGHTER: Charlotte Broady looks ‘like a different girl’ now she is in remission after suffering from leukaemia last year.
FIGHTER: Charlotte Broady looks ‘like a different girl’ now she is in remission after suffering from leukaemia last year. Rob Williams

"One tough cookie" doing well after battle with leukaemia

LEUKAEMIA sufferer Charlotte Broady has been described as "one tough cookie".

The 9-year-old from Rosewood battled the cancer in 2012 and 2013 and is now in remission and doing well.

Charlotte's mother Lorraine Broady said the family could not have coped if it wasn't for Childhood Cancer Support accommodation.

"Originally we were driving back and forth when Charlotte was having her treatment, but for her bone marrow transport it was vital that we were close by," she said.

"We were in a two-storey apartment with a kitchen.

"All we had to provide was food and our clothing.

"The rest was provided by CCS at no cost.

"It took the financial strain and stress away and we could focus on getting Charlotte better."

Mrs Broady said many regional families were not as lucky as hers and did not receive a much-needed place in CCS accommodation due to a lack of funding.

"Nobody would really know it's there for families that need it; we didn't," she said.

"There's such a big waiting list and I am blessed we got to stay there and feel bad for the families waiting to get in."

"Having our family together, being with my husband and two older children helped us immensely."

The organisation currently provides accommodation for 12 families at Herston, right behind the Royal Children's Hospital, as well as transport services, financial assistance, emotional support and social activities.

Childhood Cancer Support general manager Lisa Godier said, unlike other services, CCS was completely free.

This allowed regional families like the Broadys to stay close to their children during difficult times.

"When your child becomes sick, everything else in life takes a back seat," she said.

"Our facilities are a home away from home for our families and every effort is made to create a caring environment.

"We receive no government funding and rely on sponsorship, fundraising and grants to continue our services."

Mrs Broady said it was not only the accommodation provided by CCS that helped her family but the social events and staff support as well.

"We met other families at the facility that are now lifelong friends; you make those bonds with them because they understand what you're going through," she said.

Mrs Broady also said her daughter had made a great recovery.

"Before Charlotte couldn't go outside," she said.

"She was in a wheelchair and now she is back at school and performing on stage again; she's more outgoing and a lot happier.

"She looks like a very different girl now."

CCS runs multiple fundraising events throughout the year with the next major fundraiser, Talk Like a Pirate Day, on September 19.

Ipswich businesses and schools are encouraged to host their own Talk Like a Pirate Day to raise funds to help regional families.

For more information or to donate visit ccs.org.au



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