Juliette Wright, founder of Givit, a web-based company which matches donated goods with the people who need them.
Juliette Wright, founder of Givit, a web-based company which matches donated goods with the people who need them. Rob Williams

Charity begins with a website

WHAT started as a charity service Juliette Wright thought she could work on in her lunch breaks has turned into a full-time venture helping hundreds of Ipswich residents in need.

The Brisbane mother said her ‘Givit’ service works like a dating agency – people and charities list what items or services they need on the Givit website.

From there, people with time and donations tell the website what they can provide, and Mrs Wright and her team match the two sides.

Since starting in February last year, the website has grown at an incredibly rapid rate, and Queensland’s disastrous summer of floods and cyclones has seen demand for Givit service grow even stronger.

“I had no idea that people were going to give so much – right now we have thousands of items being offered up,” Mrs Wright said.

“We even have children donating and trying to help out; the response from the community really has been amazing.

“We work closely with charity groups to match up what they need with what people can give.

“I think the service has taken off because the website is very simple, very transparent, and charities end up receiving what they need.”

Mrs Wright spoke about Givit at ABC 612 Brisbane’s broadcast from Ipswich yesterday.

Last year the charity ended up matching 3000 donations to charities in need.

Since the floods, they have matched about 33,0000 items to charities, including 5000 pairs of gumboots in the weeks immediately after the floodwaters peaked in Brisbane and Ipswich.

It was steel-capped boots, not gumboots, which gave the mother of two the idea for the charity.

Wanting to donate baby clothes to charity, she ended up talking to a charity worker who told her they did not need clothes – what they desperately needed was steel-capped work boots.

“They needed the boots because it would allow people to get into work,” she said.

“It made me realise that we presume we know what people need but they might need something completely different.”

There has been a huge demand for items and services in Ipswich, exacerbated by the region’s charities themselves being damaged in the floods.

Mrs Wright said if people were able to donate office supplies to some of the charities, the benefits would then flow on to the people who rely on them.

“If anyone is able to help, I would encourage them to have a look at the website,” she said.

What we want

Some of the biggest needs for the Ipswich region include:

Gift cards for essential services like food

Bedside tables and wardrobes

Office equipment

If you can provide any of these items, visit www.givit.org.au.



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