The Springfield Anglican College foundation teachers Robyn Behr and Grier Elliot.
The Springfield Anglican College foundation teachers Robyn Behr and Grier Elliot. Rob Williams

Celebrating 25 years: TSAC reflects on rapid growth

FROM just a handful to almost 1000 students, The Springfield Anglican College has seen many changes over the years and one teacher has been there to witness it all.

Grier Elliot was one of the two foundation teaching members at what was then called The Springfield College 25 years ago and said the growth of the college had been phenomenal.

The Mount Gravatt East mother of two started out with fellow teacher and now friend, Robyn Behr with just 12 students, making up the entire school from prep to grade three classes.

"I guess because it was a starting college, it was pretty exciting to know you were coming in at ground level and we were able to provide input into certain aspects with regards to how things would run,” Mrs Elliot said.

"Because we were the sister school to the then Forest Lake College, all the hard work so to speak had already been done.

"I was the grade two to three composite teacher and Robyn was prep to year one, so all together we had two teachers, a principal, a secretary and a before and after school care person.

"We were at this same location and it was pretty much the main reception area building and the building next to it.

"It was good and we would have specialist lessons from teachers that would come across from Forest Lake and who would teach the kids Chinese and violin lessons and after that we just grew.

The Springfield Anglican College foundation teachers Robyn Behr (right) and Grier Elliot.
The Springfield Anglican College foundation teachers Robyn Behr (right) and Grier Elliot. Contributed

TSAC now has 900 students across both junior and senior campuses from Prep to Year 12, with an additional 88 in the Kindergarten.

The highly popular school has built a reputation for being a pioneer in the space of STEM learning and entrepreneurial studies and is also the first school in the world to have created a 360 video of its facilities.

Mrs Grier said some of the highlights from her time at the college had been to see the expansion of the school and watching her students succeed.

"I don't think our kids ever missed out even when we were smaller because everybody knew each other and it was nice,” Mrs Grier said.

"I've been here so long now and have seen people grow up and have kids and then taught their kids, so many people have stayed in the area, especially now with the university being here.

"We've got a girl here at the moment who did her schooling at the college and is now back doing her work experience as a teacher, so that kind of stuff is really nice to see.”

Springfield has a reputation for being a tight-knit community and Mrs Grier agreed it was a special place to work and admired the sense of unity she felt in the region.

"You only have to pass the signs advertising a fete here or a fun-run there and it's always all inviting,” she said.

"Since the park opened up and all the things Domain Parklands put on, you just know that a lot of people flock to those events and enjoy taking part in them.

"It's definitely a different suburb compared to other suburbs because I think people do like that community feel.”



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