HANDS ON: Woodcrest State College students Skye Meredeth and Allera Abbott with Major Gareth Pihl and an Engineering Link Project speaker.
HANDS ON: Woodcrest State College students Skye Meredeth and Allera Abbott with Major Gareth Pihl and an Engineering Link Project speaker. Contributed

USQ Springfield visit eye opener for Woodcrest students

A GROUP of Woodcrest State College students learned about integrating science, maths and technology into engineering during a hands-on workshop at the University of Southern Queensland (USQ) Springfield recently.

Run by Queensland-based education company Engineering Link Group, the project gave Year 10 and 11 students practical experience led by experts and an insight into how the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) subjects are connected.

USQ Senior Lecturer (Engineering/Technology Management) Dr David Thorpe said the main aim of the workshop was to encourage students to continue studying maths and science, and consider a future in engineering.

"The workshop was a great chance for students to broaden their understanding of the STEM learning opportunities, as well as gain an idea of the extensive career choices available to engineering graduates," Dr Thorpe said.

"Having the students visit the campus really opened their eyes to the possibilities of tertiary studies.

"We wanted them to know that if you dream of working in engineering, USQ can help you achieve your goal."

Working with industry professionals, students were tasked to design wind turbines and calculate the power output of each turbine.

They were also asked to build model cars that needed to be able to travel a set distance in a set time.

Engineering Link Group CEO Greg Millican said the participants were engaged and eager to learn.

He hoped the workshop inspired them to pursue an exciting career in engineering.

"It's a rewarding career and I've never met an engineer who doesn't enjoy their job," Mr Millican said.

"They're the ones who shape the world and are the inventors of the future.

"They decide where the roads go and where the buildings are built. They also give us clean water and provide us with electricity."

Woodcrest State College science teacher Justin Hackwill said the activities were simple, practical and hands-on, sparking the students' interest in science and technology.

"We wanted to give our students the chance to have a better understanding of what they're aiming for in terms of their career goals and what the expectations of those careers are," he said.

For more information about engineering at USQ, visit usq.edu.au/hes



2020 election too soon to call for veteran councillors

premium_icon 2020 election too soon to call for veteran councillors

Both reluctant to make a call on running again in 18 months

Apology handed down to Ipswich residents at the 11th hour

premium_icon Apology handed down to Ipswich residents at the 11th hour

"There has been a stench over council and I want to see that lifted"

Homeless man the victim of 'brutal, cowardly' street bashing

premium_icon Homeless man the victim of 'brutal, cowardly' street bashing

Magistrate horrified by young attacker's assault

Local Partners