Community

Bowled over by Playboy bid

INDECENT PROPOSAL: Julie Dalgarno reflects on her younger days.
INDECENT PROPOSAL: Julie Dalgarno reflects on her younger days. Rob Williams

JULIE Dalgarno was almost a centrefold in Playboy magazine.

The former world champion ten pin bowler was 16 years old when a man approached her at the bowling centre saying he wanted to do a magazine article and photo spread with her.

In those days bowling skirts were short and good girls like Julie weren't familiar with men's magazines like Playboy.

She took the man's business card and told him she would have to ask her father's permission first.

"I was very naive then," Julie said.

"I told my dad when I got home, he asked me what magazine the man was from.

"Playboy, I told him, he said they wanted to do a centrefold. My dad took the business card, called the man and I never heard from him again."

Julie, the middle child in a family of three girls, grew up in Sydney near Chatswood and started bowling when she was nine years old.

She won the Australian titles, the state titles, took home a silver and a bronze medal, and was once ranked 25th in the world.

In the 1970s Julie and her mother took the media by storm when they became the first ever mother and daughter duo to be picked for the state, and later national, teams.

Throughout her childhood and young adult years bowling was at the centre of her life - her mother and father both worked at the bowling centre and that's where she met her husband Brian.

Technically, the two were already acquainted - they went to primary school together but there was no love lost between good girl Julie and the bad boy Brian.

"I didn't like him," Julie said.

"He was naughty and I was a prefect who used to bring the teachers their morning tea."

Julie and Brian went to different high schools and didn't see each other for a few years until being reunited at the bowling centre where Julie was working part-time.

One day, Brian, who once parked a teacher's car in the school auditorium, asked Julie if he could walk her home after work, but she wasn't interested and turned down his offer.

The next week he asked again, and again she said no.

"The third time he asked I thought OK because I only lived about ten minutes down the road," she said.

"On the way we stopped at the park and sat talking for hours - I didn't get home until 3am."

The pair started dating and Julie clearly remembers the night she brought Brian home to meet her parents for the first time, over family dinner.

The Wimbledon tennis tournament was on television and Julie's father, who she describes as racist, started a "rant about one of the darker" players.

That didn't go down well with 16-year-old Brian, who had lived in Burma for seven years.

"'Well you're a racist so and so aren't you?', Brian said to my father.

"And I thought - oh well this is a good first meeting.

"Dad had a shot at him, Brian had another shot back and I thought 'well I won't be seeing you again Brian, see you later'."

After Brian had left, Julie was in the kitchen making tea for her mum and nana when her father came in and told her, much to her surprise, how much he liked Brian.

"He stands up for what he believes and I like that," her dad said.

After that the two men "got a long like a house on fire".

When Brian's father died, he came to Julie's house for comfort, sitting with her father all night crying.

"They started going to the club together after that and I remember one day Brian had thought he would be able to outdrink my father," Julie said.

"Now my father was a big drinker. I remember they went up to the club at 9am and by lunch time my father was carrying him home."

It seems Brian had actually decided to leave the club sometime before that but only made it as far as a nearby garden, which is where Julie's father found him before dragging him home to sober up.

When Julie and Brian became engaged, the bowling fraternity was sceptical, saying they'd be lucky to last six months together.

Next month they will celebrate their 43rd wedding anniversary.

Throughout her bowling career there were two standout moments for Julie - when she was picked to play at the world cup team and when she bowled a near perfect game.

"It was at Leichhardt Bowling, Sydney about 1986," Julie said.

"There were two floors with 16 lanes on each and I remember the centre was packed.

"It was very traumatic because everyone stopped in the whole place and stared at me. All you could hear was the clunk of the balls, other than that it was dead silent."

Julie had already bowled perfect scores and said she cracked a little under the pressure, bowling slightly off and landing a 297, instead of 300 - the highest score for a game of ten pin bowling.

It was still a major achievement and a plaque was erected above the lanes to mark the moment she almost achieved a perfect score in a professional women's competition.

Bowling took Julie all over the world. She competed in Singapore, Bangkok, Paris, Belgium, England, Holland and Germany.

Julie is 64 and only gave up playing in 2003 after knocking the pins down finally lost its appeal for her, taking up a job at Red Cross instead.

Now all she wants to do is live out her days with bad boy Brian at Tivoli Gardens and, if she had enough money, help her children buy a house for their own families.

"I've always wanted to help people," Julie said.

Topics:  general-seniors-news magazine mylifemystory playboy



Heavy fine for "greedy" mud crab haul

Fisheries seizes an illegal catch of mud crabs.

Fisherman fined $3,100 and ordered to forfeit gear

The true cause of the Oscars bungle

Faye Dunaway, left, and Warren Beatty present the award for best picture at the Oscars on Sunday, Feb. 26, 2017, at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles.

The Oscars ended with a moment that left everyone speechless.

Talented young apprentice worth watching

SMILE OF SUCCESS: Apprentice jockey Sally Sweeney celebrates winning on board Dazzling Halo in the Kevin Keidge Memorial race at Bundamba Racetrack on Thursday.

Ipswich success could be start of exciting career

Local Partners

The true cause of the Oscars bungle

THE Oscars have ended with a moment that left everyone speechless — but not in a way anyone expected.

HUGE OSCARS FAIL: Wrong film handed Best Picture award

Presenter Warren Beatty shows the envelope with the actual winner for best picture as host Jimmy Kimmel, left, looks on at the Oscars on Sunday, Feb. 26, 2017, at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles. The winner was originally announced as La La Land, but was later corrected to Moonlight.

IN A monumental stuff-up, La La Land incorrectly named Best Picture.

Blue Heelers' Ditch Davey joins 800 Words cast

Ditch Davey joins the cast of 800 Words as Terry, the younger brother of George, played by Erik Thomson.

George Turner's brother, Terry, arrives to Weld with a 'few demons'

Oscars winners 2017: Full list of Academy Award winners

Viola Davis accepts the award for best actress in a supporting role for Fences at the Oscars on Sunday, Feb. 26, 2017, at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles.

WHO won Oscars this year? Here’s a full list of every winner.

Why can’t Nicole Kidman clap properly?

Nicole Kidman's style of clapping has puzzled Oscars viewers.

FOR some reason, it seems Nicole doesn’t really know how to clap.

Muslim actor makes Oscars history

Mahershala Ali accepts the award for best actor in a supporting role for Moonlight at the Oscars on Sunday, Feb. 26, 2017, at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles.

MOONLIGHT star Mahershala Ali makes Academy Award history.

NO ONE OFF LIMITS: Kimmel burns down the house at Oscars

Host Jimmy Kimmel speaks at the Oscars on Sunday, Feb. 26, 2017, at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles.

HOST delivers a torrent of abuse on Hollywood’s night of nights.

Mining homes dive: $600k homes sell for $120k-$300k

18 Yeates Street, Moranbah sold for $135,000 in December, after being repossessed by a bank. The owners bought for $545,000 in August, 2011.

The economy still has two speeds, but with a painful twist

Mackay's property market climbing like a Rocket Man

Renewed confidence in Mackay means more homes are being snapped up by those eager to plant their roots in the region.

There's movement in the real estate sector and it's all positive.

'Why we drove 800km to buy a treehouse with a disco ball'

The new owners have planned a few updates, but will stick with much of the original design.

A couple travelled almost 800km for the home of their dreams.

The trick homeowners are using to buy more properties

Chantelle Subritzky leaves her home each week for Airbnb guests.

Queenslanders are going down this path to help pay their mortgages

Stunning home blends South Pacific beauty with Orient style

Immaculate residence with two outdoor living areas

Ready to SELL your property?

Post Your Ad Here!