Deb Sutton and Leigh-Ann Hargreaves are members of A Bittersweet Book Affair book club.
Deb Sutton and Leigh-Ann Hargreaves are members of A Bittersweet Book Affair book club. Rob Williams

Book clubs a novel idea for older readers

READING can be a novel experience for some people while for others it holds great enjoyment.

Unfortunately, many people don't get the time to sit down to read and quite often it is only once they retire from the workforce that they reacquaint themselves with reading for pleasure.

For those who do the daily commute to work, reading may be used to pass the time or if that commute is by vehicle then it may be by audio book or listening to music or talkback radio.

By the time they have returned home at the end of the day the chores of daily life grind on.

Is it any wonder we don't get the time to relax over a novel?

You may read for the pure enjoyment of it or you may read to gain knowledge.

Whatever it is, reading can be different for everyone.

Some people look to reading to occupy their time, particularly as they get older.

Joining a book club is one way of doing just that and at the same time combining the enjoyment of reading with a social and intellectual outlet.

Sitting around with others discussing a novel with other people can be enlightening and rewarding.

Book clubs have become common place in society and maybe that is due to television and the program titled The Book Club hosted by Jennifer Byrne.

A stage production starring Amanda Muggleton of the same name was also a popular play when it toured the country.

Ipswich audiences enjoyed this production very much when it came to our Civic Centre.

So, what is it about Book Clubs that attracts people - is it plainly the enjoyment of reading?

Is it the intellectual stimulation gained from discussing the plot of the novel, the writing style of the author or is it about combining these elements with socialising?

According to Deb Sutton, belonging to a book club is about all of those things.

"I enjoy chatting to others about different novels which in turn extends my reading interests. Chatting with others who may have a differing opinion about the same book helps me broaden my knowledge.

"I also like the social aspects as we always try to go to a coffee shop or a restaurant at varying times as a social outing to discuss a book," she said.

The one thing about book clubs is that they can be as formal or as informal as you like.

When starting a new book club, you choose the meeting location and times, members and books.

Think about why you want to start a book club.

Is it for literary discussion or social interaction? Are you looking for serious literary debate or light-hearted discussion?

Whatever the reason, book clubs can be fun and very rewarding.

For more information about book clubs, contact the Ipswich Library on 3810 6815.



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