Parking comes at a premium in Mooloolaba, but the Sunshine Coast Council is looking to combat the daily struggle by regulating dozens more spaces.
Parking comes at a premium in Mooloolaba, but the Sunshine Coast Council is looking to combat the daily struggle by regulating dozens more spaces. John McCutcheon

Best things in life are free, but should be regulated

DOING unintentional "mainies" of the Mooloolaba esplanade has me reminiscing about the years I spent living a block back from the beach.

Life was good: finding a park was never a problem, pristine beaches were a stroll away, and I was filled with an unwarranted sense of satisfaction as beachgoers lapped for a coveted space.

They got their payback though, with the odd person pulling into my carpark and forcing me onto the street or into nearby private parking.

I was outraged. I had paid for the privilege of living there and yet was forced to fight for a space or cop a passive-aggressive note threatening to tow my car. But looking back I can hardly blame the park thieves or the threat makers.

Finding a space in Mooloolaba, or near any of our beaches, is near impossible.

The Sunshine Coast Council will tomorrow discuss a plan to open up 24 new off-street regulated parking areas on private and council-owned land in Mooloolaba.

Sure, this may expose the "secret" spots locals have uncovered over the years, but if it means more parking for all who could argue?

And if it means visitors who buy a bottle of water entitles them to all-day customer parking, even better.

With plans for a paid, multi-storey carpark falling over in June this year, and the future of the site unconfirmed, I think this is a good compromise.

The best things in life should be free, but they should have a time limit.

Carpark demand isn't going anywhere, and it can't wait for developers and council to agree on a solution.

Noosa Council is trialling four-hour parks at a number of spaces nearby the National Park, and I welcome the Sunshine Coast following suit.



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