Baits laid for wild dogs

THE final round of a six-month wild dog baiting program in the Somerset will be conducted at the end of the month.

Somerset Mayor Graeme Lehmann said the region relied on farmers out of town to bait for dogs in order to help control the animals closer to residential areas.

"I can't bait where I am," he said. "I have to try and hope farmers on bigger farms are baiting to maintain the wild dogs."

Cr Lehmann said baiting was banned close to population centres to stop domestic dogs eating baited meat.

"Wild dogs are an issue for the region," he said.

"They can really hurt sheep, cattle and goat industries in the area."

The practice of dog baiting has come under criticism in western Queensland, with wild dogs still a major issue despite decades of baiting.

Cr Lehmann defended the practice in the Somerset, and said he believed most farmers would agree with baiting.

"I think 95% of farmers would agree with baiting, or maybe a combination of baiting and shooting wild dogs, if you asked them," he said.

"Farmers have to put signs up on their properties warning about the baits when they are baiting, and those close to towns aren't allowed to do it at all."

Cr Lehmann said dogs remained an issue for Somerset farmers, with dingos and wild feral dogs present in the area.

Wild dog baiting programs are run by the State Government through local councils.



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