A Ringtail possum Joey from Forest Lake. He was rescued by a member of public after being attacked by crows. Picture: Peter Glanvill
A Ringtail possum Joey from Forest Lake. He was rescued by a member of public after being attacked by crows. Picture: Peter Glanvill

Animal hospital overrun with wildlife during ‘trauma’ season

Already under pressure from the “trauma” season and the recent bushfires, RSPCA Qld’s Wildlife hospital has been hit with vast numbers of native animals and birds displaced and injured during the recent storms.

On Thursday the hospital took in 63 marsupials, 55 native birds, 3 native reptiles, 6 placental mammals and 4 non-native birds. In the early hours of the morning, night staff dealt with another 68 incoming animals.

"Amy' from Redbank Creek (west of Lake Wivenhoe) who was displaced by bush fires. Shes a 3yr old female with a pinky (very young joey) in front pocket. The joey is too young to come out of the pouch. Picture: Peter Glanvill

Unfortunately December is always a very busy month. To date the hospital has taken in 973 animals which averages about 77-81 animals per day. Our November average was at 87. In November, 149 koalas came into the hospital compared to 56 for the same period last year.

“The trauma season is always busy because the animals are moving around, looking for mates and giving birth,” said RSPCA Qld spokesperson Michael Beatty. “They get run over by cars and attacked by dogs. But this year the fires and now these storms have aggravated the problems. Our staff and volunteers are exhausted.”



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