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Tools cut a pathway to past

Cultural Heritage officer Richard Bonner (front) working at an archeological site where the new Richlands to Springfield train line is being constructed. Also pictured is archeologist Michael Strong and Transport Minister Annastacia Palaszczuk MP.
Cultural Heritage officer Richard Bonner (front) working at an archeological site where the new Richlands to Springfield train line is being constructed. Also pictured is archeologist Michael Strong and Transport Minister Annastacia Palaszczuk MP. David Nielsen

A HISTORIC site rich in Aboriginal artefacts has been uncovered where the Springfield train line is to be constructed.

Within metres of the Centenary Hwy and Woodcrest College around 700 artefacts believed to be 2000 years old have been found adjacent to Sandy Creek.

The artefacts, found on the land of the Jagera, Yuggera and Ugarapul people, are stone splinters intentionally created to use as tools.

Turnstone Archaeology Principal Archeologist Michael Strong said the finds were fantastic.

The team set up three test pits along the train line corridor, in accordance with QR's best practice methods. Many of the stone tools were found only 10cm beneath the surface.

The splinters were intentionally knocked off larger rocks to be used as tools.

"The skill to be able to create something like that is absolutely amazing work the way they knock off the flakes," he said.

"We could piece them back together again and see into the minds of the people from 2000 years ago."

The flakes, most around 5cm in length, were attached to short wooden handles and used to cut up deceased animals.

Transport Minister Annastacia Palaszczuk was amazed as she held the tiny artefacts in her hand.

"It's amazing to have 2000-year-old history in my hand. I would like to see in the future that this history is taught in the local schools," she said

Ms Palaszczuk said the history is unique to the region and QR is working closely with the archeologists to make sure the history is documented.

Mr Strong and his archeological team spent five days excavating the original 6m by 4m pit, before expanding it by another 3m when so many artefacts were discovered.

The tools were in such good condition Mr Strong said they were sharp enough to shave with.

He said Aboriginal history must always be preserved.

"I think it is really important people don't dismiss Aboriginal artefacts and what relationship it has with the area."

The artefacts will remain with the Jagera people.

Topics:  aboriginal archaeology history springfield tools



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