“We hope that this CSG Well Calculator will encourage landholders to be proactive in developing their property plans to protect their surface rights.
“We hope that this CSG Well Calculator will encourage landholders to be proactive in developing their property plans to protect their surface rights."

Alliance launches gas calculator

LANDHOLDERS can get a better understanding of how gasfield developments may impact on their properties thanks to a new web-based calculator launched by the Basin Sustainability Alliance.

BSA chairman Ian Hayllor said the CSG Well Calculator was a way to communicate the seriousness of coal seam gas (CSG) development impacts to landholders.

"Many landholders have CSG tenures over their land but are unsure as to what it really means to them," Mr Hayllor said.

“We hope that this CSG Well Calculator will encourage landholders to be proactive in developing their property plans to protect their surface rights.

“We also think that this could be a useful tool for businesses who rely on primary production – such as agronomists, machinery manufacturers and other rural supply businesses – to consider the impact gasfield development may have on their farming clients and the ripple effect this may have on their businesses.”

The calculator, found at www.basinsustainabilityalliance.org uses average and minimum well density spacings outlined in the CSG companies’ conceptual gasfield development plans to calculate the number of CSG wells which the company could consider for an area of land. It also provides an estimate of the area that would be used for gravelled roadways.

Mr Hayllor said the calculator was an indicative guide to the CSG well and road footprint area only and did not take into account gathering lines (water and gas), pipelines (water and gas), electricity lines, compressor stations, above ground signage, surface venting infrastructure and holding ponds and other infrastructure that could add to the impact that a landholder might experience.

He said the calculator was simple to use.

“The user just enters their property size and chooses the CSG company from the major company list of Arrow, Origin, QGC and Santos and within seconds will receive information about the number of wells and other impacts that may apply to your land,” he said.

There is also an 'other company' drop-down box allowing the user to enter the different gasfield variables from other CSG companies’ environmental management plans.

Mr Hayllor said the full implications of a CGS company's desk-top planning is contained in their environmental management plans that are lodged when they apply for their Environmental Authority. However, he stressed that it was important landholders realised that CSG companies are not required to notify individual affected landholders of their plans.

“The onus is on the landholder to watch the public notices section of newspapers, seek out the application and raise their concerns through a submission process”, he said.

“The CSG companies are only required consult with landholders when they need access to the property, so we are encouraging landholders to be prepared and informed before they get the knock on the door from the CSG company. The consultation period is the landholder's key opportunity to make sure that impacts are minimised and unreasonable interference to the landholder’s business and lifestyle is avoided.

A range of tips and advice for landholders has been compiled in a landholder factsheet also available on the BSA website.
 



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