Who doesn't love a story involving a prison break.
Who doesn't love a story involving a prison break.

The best $39 you’ll spend all year

HAVING grown accustomed to paying around $100 for video games, I was a little dubious when I saw a new title from EA advertised for just $39.95.

My doubts over the bargain bin price tag were only made worse by the fact the game could be played co-op online, but only required one user to have purchased a copy.

There was no way a game two people could play for less than $40 could be good I had thought to myself, but it turns out I could not have been further from the truth.

In fact, I am willing to suggest A Way Out could be one of the best value games of the year.

The cinematic prison-break adventure comes from the studio headed by filmmaker-turned-game-developer Josef Fares, which explains the unique gameplay and style of the title.

Set in the 1970s, A Way Out follows convicted prisoners Leo and Vincent who break out of prison and stay on the run from authorities.

Both characters have distinct personalities with Vincent being a level-headed smooth talker, while Leo is more of an aggressive brawler.

The game cannot be played alone, as players need to rely on the other character to get through each task.

I forced my dad to take the boring one and I played with the Leo.

Regardless of whether it's played locally or online, A Way Out uses a split screen to allow you to see what is happening on the screen of your buddy.

As a player you will see the action from both characters on the split screen.
As a player you will see the action from both characters on the split screen.

What makes the six-hour campaign interesting, is it plays more like an interactive movie than a video game with players forced to watch the cut scenes before taking control of the character.

Each moment of gameplay can be approached differently, with players needed to co-operate together in order to progress.

For example, when trying to escape prison one player needs to distract the guards, while the other digs his way out his cell.

Other instances include having to tap X simultaneously to break open a door or one player splashing around in a pond so fish swim toward the other person holding a spear.

Each mini game is surprisingly fun and challenging enough to keep you from growing bored.

Being someone who usually skips cut scenes in order to progress to the action, I can say that I really enjoyed the format of A Way Out.

While I don't think the cinematic approach would work with all narratives, the story of a prison break is something I was able to 100 per cent get behind, finding myself completely involved with the tale from start to end.

It might not be the most action-packed game I have ever played, but I have no problem recommending A Way Out for your collection.

The title well exceeds its price tag and could be the start of a new era of gaming.

And Twitter agrees too.

 

 

 



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