HE GETS spewed and bled on, works through the night and faces horrific trauma scenes but Steve Kleise loves his job.

Mr Kleise has been saving Ipswich lives for the last 29 years and is often among the first faces people see when they are sick or injured.

A day in the life of Ipswich paramedic Steve Kleise.
A day in the life of Ipswich paramedic Steve Kleise. Rob Williams

He's found behind the wheel or beside the bed in an ambulance, running on adrenaline as he rushes to a help a patient with code one lights and sirens blaring.

"The best part is getting out and helping people, that's why I got in this job, I enjoy helping people. In this job people respect you too, you're there to help them so they try to help us," he said.

"This is very rewarding because we help people in a lot of different ways. There is so much we can do to help people now it has changed so much in the last 29 years."

Mr Keleise's career is defined by lives he has saved, people he has helped and moments of strength and reassurance for someone in a moment of panic.

A day in the life of Ipswich paramedic Steve Kleise.
A day in the life of Ipswich paramedic Steve Kleise. Rob Williams

 

"There are many jobs that stick in my memory for ever, they're there in the back of your mind. I always keep in my head we have done the best possible for that patient and you just have to keep that frame of mind. We also have a fantastic support unit with the Queensland Ambulance Service," he said.

"One recently was a young lady who was burnt in a house fire and survived and she's made a fantastic recovery and we've kept in touch. That's one that sticks in my mind and will be there for the rest of your life.

"You do the best you can but sometimes they just might not be able to survive.

"Half you treatment is reassurance. I like to make people laugh a little bit, to laugh and have a bit of a giggle is half the pain relief."

He said those moments might be at the scene of a house fire or with a patient with vomiting and diarrhoea.

"Whether its sever trauma or just someone who's sick. It might be basic to us but to that person it might be the first time they've had to call 000. It might be the 10,000th time I've seen vomiting and diarrhoea it's nothing to me but to that person it's quite severe and they're very distressed," he said.

"It's very rewarding for me to go in there and reassure that person, to know we can help that person, to do something to make them feel better and help them in their healing process."

Mr Kleise became an advanced care paramedic after a career change and an overwhelming desire to help people in crisis.

"I was a boiler maker by trade so it was a big change. I was looking for a change in career. I thought that might be something different so back in 1987 I joined the Ipswich Ambulance Transport Brigade as an honouree officer volunteer getting a little bit of experience," he said.

"I love Ipswich, I was born at Boonah but I love Ipswich, it has everything my family needs." 

A day in the life of Ipswich paramedic Steve Kleise.
A day in the life of Ipswich paramedic Steve Kleise. Rob Williams

 

What to do to help a paramedic on their way to a patient

Advance care paramedic Steve Kleise said the most important thing to remember when an ambulance or emergency service vehicle was approaching was not to panic.

"It can get frustrating cars not getting out your way but what you have to imagine is that person while driving might look in the mirror and realise there's an ambulance and it might take three seconds for them to remember what to do," he said.

"You have to allow people to respond and prepared to remember what to do. If you take it at a fairly reasonable place and remember what to do, Ipswich is not too bad."

  • Do not panic
  • Slow down (but do not brake rapidly)
  • Use indicators
  • Be aware of other motorists; drivers should not play music at such a volume they cannot hear outside sounds.
  • Do not move suddenly or move into the path of the emergency vehicle
  • Move as far to the left of the road as possible and come to a stop.
  • If unable to move out of the path safely, keep moving forward until it's safe to move over.
  • Remember, drivers are required to abide by road rules at all times.
A day in the life of Ipswich paramedic Steve Kleise.
A day in the life of Ipswich paramedic Steve Kleise. Rob Williams


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