Personal item begin to pile up at the Thiess facility in Swanbank.
Personal item begin to pile up at the Thiess facility in Swanbank. Rob Williams

100,000 tonnes will be tipped

IPSWICH City Council says a massive 100,000 tonnes of rubbish from the city's flood victims will have to be trucked to dumps.

Councillor Trevor Nardi said workers were toiling 24 hours a day to deal with the garbage.

“Seven thousand tonnes has come out of Goodna alone.

“Potentially we could have 100,000 tonnes out of the whole city,” Cr Nardi said.

He said the council switched the garbage collection to nights until tomorrow because the dumps were too chaotic.

“I've heard of waits of up to three hours,” he said yesterday.

“We're hoping that by Wednesday night or Thursday morning we'll be on top of it.

“If you are flood-affected the best way is to put your rubbish on the footpath and we'll pick it up.

“You can go to the transfer stations at Riverview, Goodna or Rosewood.

“But if everyone goes at the same time there will be long waits.”

Twenty-four hours a day, trucks file in, drive to the top of a garbage mountain and dump rubbish that is compacted and covered with soil.

Site supervisor Harry Jones said there were 5500 trucks between midnight and 3pm yesterday.

About 8800 were expected in 24 hours.

From a distance the rubbish is indistinguishable.

Up close it's a mass collection of the remnants of people's lives – mattresses, tyres, clothes, toys.

As he talks, Mr Jones reaches down to the dirty mud and picks up a pure white golf ball.

“The way it looks, this is going to keep going for a while,” Mr Jones said.



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