News

Savage assault leaves man, 71, shattered

Robert Turvey suffered a broken nose after being attacked near his Anzac Avenue home.
Robert Turvey suffered a broken nose after being attacked near his Anzac Avenue home. Callum Bentley

UPDATE: THE Toowoomba Hospital's acting executive director Dr Peter Gillies has defended the treatment given to a 71-year-old assault victim.

The Chronicle yesterday ran an article about Robert Turvey who said he spent almost 10 hours in the Toowoomba Hospital emergency department with a broken nose after being assaulted near his home on Anzac Ave.

Dr Gillies said according to hospital records and discussions with staff, the patient presented to the emergency department at 9.24pm.

He said Mr Turvey was assessed by a female doctor soon afterwards and treatment started.

At 2.20am Mr Turvey was again seen by a doctor and underwent an x-ray. He was discharged from the department at 6.09am.

"While it was a very busy evening in the emergency department the patient received the appropriate clinical care for his injuries," Dr Gillies said.

"I understand the information in the Toowoomba Chronicle has come directly from the patient and I apologise if the patient felt his treatment was lacking.

"Medical staff will be reminded to introduce themselves to minimise any possible confusion for patients in the future."

EARLIER: ROBERT Turvey, 71, had no way of knowing the shocking incident which was about to unfold as he stepped out of the cab around the corner from his Anzac Ave home, just as he did every Friday night.

As the cab drove off up the street, Mr Turvey had not taken more than 10 steps before he noticed out of the corner of his eye a shadow coming from behind him.

As he turned towards the figure he felt a crushing blow to his face before he fell to the ground in a "screaming heap."

The meat tray which he had just won at the pub fell to the ground before his face crashed into it.

Still conscious, Mr Turvey turned to his attacker, screaming at the cowardly person who was already fleeing.

Before he had any more time to think, Mr Turvey jumped to his feet and ran to his home less than 30 metres away.

With blood pouring from his face, Mr Turvey called an ambulance which took him to the Toowoomba Hospital.

The time was 9pm.

Mr Turvey was given pain killers from a nurse in the emergency department before being told to take a seat in the waiting room, his face sporting "two beautiful black eyes and a whole lot of pain."

About 2.30am, detectives from Toowoomba police arrived at the emergency department to talk to Mr Turvey.

They took him to a more comfortable room and made him coffee as their line of questioning began.

"The police handled it extremely well," Mr Turvey said.

"They asked the nurse if I could stay in there because it was a lot more comfortable than sitting on those hard chairs."

About 6.30am, almost 10 hours later, a doctor was available to see Mr Turvey.

He was assessed and released with a "shattered" nose.

Mr Turvey is staying upbeat about his injuries, telling people he suffered a "cheap facelift gone wrong", and urging people if they are seeking to get one for themselves to "avoid the 2 x 4 treatment."

But one thing he will not waver on is the amount of time he had to wait to be seen by a doctor, saying it was ridiculous an "elderly man covered in blood with a broken nose had to wait that long to be seen by a doctor."

Police investigations are continuing and anyone who might have any information regarding the incident on the night of Friday, February 22 should contact Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000.

Topics:  anzac avenue, assault, emergency department, hospital



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