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New laws give parents more control over video games

Gametraders owner David Campbell has welcomed new legislation that requires gamers to provide proof of age when purchasing R18+ games.
Gametraders owner David Campbell has welcomed new legislation that requires gamers to provide proof of age when purchasing R18+ games. Callum Bentley

NEW Queensland legislation requiring computer gamers to show proof of age when purchasing violent or graphic video games is set to put the power back into the hands of concerned parents.

But Gametraders Toowoomba owner David Campbell believes the new measures may not be as effective as intended.

The new legislation will introduce the R18+ category to certain video games.

The move has delighted gamers who now expect a greater range of "realistic" games to enter the market.

The move also gives parents piece of mind knowing that children will not be able to purchase the games without first showing proof of age beforehand.

However Mr Campbell, who owns and runs Gametraders a computer game retailer in Grand Central, said children would still be able to access R18+ game-play videos from internet video-sharing sites like YouTube.

"Kids will still be able to go on and watch these game-play clips if they want too," Mr Campbell said.

"That's going to be the hard thing for parents to control.

"As for us it's just like bottle shops selling alcohol, we'll have to check people's IDs if we think they are under 18."

Should gamers have to show proof of age when purchasing video games?

This poll ended on 18 March 2013.

Yes - 84%

No - 15%

This is not a scientific poll. The results reflect only the opinions of those who chose to participate.

Mr Campbell said customers purchasing MA15+ games from his store who he believed to be under 15 were already being asked for ID.

Attorney-General Jarrod Bleijie said in a statement that the introduction of the R18+ classification, which has already been implemented in other states and territories around the country, would protect underage gamers from inappropriate material.

"I encourage parents to be guided by these classifications, as I'm sure many are aware of the levels of violence and adult material contained in some computer games," he said.

"This system has worked with films for a long time and it makes sense for computer games to be treated in the same way."

Topics:  classification, toowoomba




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