Opinion

Mobile love affair an all-consuming thing

I CAN no longer remember a world where information isn't readily available at my fingertips.

The mobile phone has changed our lives, for the better I think, but I'm sure not everyone agrees with me.

It's opened us up to connectivity 24/7.

Some revel in it, almost obsessed with it, while others find it more of a burden and curse.

I remember getting my first mobile phone.

It was one of those "indestructible" Nokia 3310s, given to me as a birthday present when I was in Year 8, I think.

All I could really do with it was call, text, and play a mean game of Snake, yet the responsibility was huge, I felt.

Maybe I was a bit too young for it at the time, but I wasn't going to say no to this exciting new piece of technology.

Little did I know how much it would change my life. Now, I can't live without it my mobile.

Not a lot of us can.

We've been spoiled by the rapidly evolving technology in this field.

We've got everything now from smaller phones and mobile games to internet access and apps.

The ability to call and text a person is hardly its selling point any more.

We're more interested in the mega pixels the camera has over the phone network we'll be connecting to.

Yet, with that instantaneous connection, comes great obsession.

For me, at least.

I had the unfortunate pleasure lately of being unable to receive and make phone calls and text messages after a delightful stuff-up by my network provider.

Not knowing what friends were up to, being unable to speak with the office, and the fear that I could miss some emergency call from my family drove me insane.

It was torturous.

I had wondered previously what it would be like to not have my phone on me 24/7.

What the world would be like if I switch it off and not have to worry about people trying to ring me urgently?

But once that world was thrust upon me, I hated it.

I need instant communication.

I admire those who think they can get by without a mobile, and without that connection to the world, but truth is they're only going to get left behind.

The world is changing every second.

How we ever got along before without the ability to communicate important pieces of information instantaneously is beyond me.

Trying to get along without a mobile phone in this day and age is madness.

How anyone can do it I'll never know.

I like my alone time, but I like to know what's going on even more.

Topics:  patrick williams




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