Feature

Mining juggernaut slows but new skills are in demand

Operations such as the QCLNG at Curtis Island are creating specialist skill sets not commonly seen in Australia.
Operations such as the QCLNG at Curtis Island are creating specialist skill sets not commonly seen in Australia. Brenda Strong

THE first phase of the mining boom is over. The latest Deloitte Access Economics report believes so, at least.

With commodities prices having retreated substantially from the highs of 2011, Deloitte believes the continued sky-high levels of investment will slow, as the sector moves deeper into its construction phase.

The construction leg of the mining boom - which accounts for about 46% of all project investment - will peak in early to mid-2014, according to Deloitte's latest Investment Monitor report.

While investment might slow, the continued construction phase will underpin employment.

Vern Wills, CEO of Site Skills Training, said $250 billion in committed investment in Australia, was largely being driven by projects in Queensland and Western Australia.

"The QCLNG, GLNG and APLNG projects, all operating in the Gladstone region, have a committed investment value of approximately US$58.9 billion," Mr Wills said.

"These projects combined are nearing peak workforce for the construction phase, averaging 6000 workers a project but is potentially nearing an aggregate 19,300 persons.

"For these projects alone there are three components of construction - the gas pipelines reaching up to 520km moving CSG from the Bowen and Surat Basin to Gladstone's Curtis Island, the CSG-to-LNG processing facilities on Curtis Island which convert the CSG to LNG for shipping, and associated development infrastructure including port facilities, storage facilities and supporting infrastructure works."

Mr Wills said the growth in the CSG and LNG industries was creating demand for skill sets that previously haven't existed in the Australian employment market.

"These projects are competing with similar projects in the West and the Northern Territory. There are specialist skill sets not commonly seen in Australia, such as side-boom operators in the construction of gas pipelines," he said.

"This is consistent with our belief that Australia is not facing a people shortage, it is facing a skill shortage.

"Further, Skills Queensland has pointed to an ABS report outlining an expected 19,000 mining and 2000 oil and gas replacement jobs to occur annually across Australia, largely due to an aging workforce and poor retention rates for remote work locations.

"Peaking investment means we are facing slowing but ongoing investment into industries delivering multi-decade projects which are dependent on local supporting services such as training, with new workers being constantly needed due to attrition and an aging workforce."

Topics:  employment, jobs, jobs news




Stay Connected

Update your news preferences and get the latest news delivered to your inbox.

'I apologise every day that I am not the person he married'

My battle with postnatal depression...

'My husband lasted 6 weeks as a stay at home dad'

APN Hey Mummy Feature for online - stock images. Katie Dykes being interviewed for the webisodes. Photo Marc Stapelberg / The Northern Star

FROM the outside, being a stay at home mum looks like a breeze.

THE EXPERT: Stop judging working mothers

SUPER MUMS: Being a working mums comes down to perfecting time management.

"WORKING for money is all right; so is working because you want to.”

Health and nutrition with kids - how do you balance it?

HOW important is health and nutrition in your household?

Smack or no smack - where do you stand?

THE debate is reignited - is smacking acceptable?

Technology and kids: Do you ever cut their wi-fi?

Check out our new video series featuring mums having a chat

Blair LNP candidate throws her support behind workers

LNP candidate for Blair Teresa Harding hands out some snags at lunch break at JBS on Wednesday.

"I will certainly be voting for her this weekend"

Council dumps higher charges on residents

RISING PRICES: Eastern Heights resident Dave Clark says if the council should towards a user pays system to cover the cost of dumps instead of “sneaking” prices up gradually.

From August 1 residents will pay $10

Hanson a real show in Senate says academic

REAL SHOW: Pauline Hanson is in there with a real chance of being elected to the Senate on July 2.

People are increasingly looking for non-major party groupings

Latest deals and offers

Vox Pop: Council's rate increase

Mayor Paul Pisasale.

Members of the public speak out on Ipswich City Council's rate increase.

Blair candidate visits meatworks

LNP candidate for Blair Teresa Harding meets workers at JBS on Wednesday.

LNP candidate for Blair visited the JBS meatworks in Dinmore on Wednesday.

Pisasale's Budget

Mayor Paul Pisasale making budget announcements at Fire Station 101.

Cr Pisasale has announced his 2016/17 budget as one that "gets things done" and...

Arts and culture get a boost in council budget

HAPPY CAMPER: Council’s culture boss Cr Charlie Pisasale will be delighted $400,000 has been allocated for a business case investigation for IPAC.

IPAC at the forefront of councillor's agenda

Burnett Heads housing development approved

COUNCIL APPROVED: A Burnett Heads housing development has been approved by Bundaberg Regional Council. Photo Contributed

Councillors approved the development seven votes to four